Category: Executive Job Search

Supply & Demand Works Better Than Ever in the Mid-December Executive Job Search

If you’ve read any of my other content, you know that I like to challenge “conventional” wisdom and go against the grain from what most people are saying. It’s not because I want to be a rebel, but the truth doesn’t change because the opinion of the majority says so. Simply put, it makes me want to declare what is true and real all the more boldly.

So what myth am I busting today? Well, it has everything to do with law of supply and demand, which generally defines the effect that the availability of a product (supply) and the desire for that product (demand) have on the price of that product. Here is a simple supply/demand chart (courtesy of Investopedia.com).

economics5

Executive Job Seeker = Supplier

What most people get wrong in this scenario is that you, the job seeker, are the supplier. After all, the company doing the hiring is paying whomever they hire to provide a product or service, which is the work performed. When the volume of products on the supply side is higher than the demand for those products, prices get driven down until suppliers bow out and equilibrium occurs. So, in this scenario, when there are a large number of candidates available on the market, then the company looking to hire can have their pick…and possibly get that person at a price below the typical market value.

How does this go against conventional wisdom, you ask? Well, let me lay out the following scenario:

  • It is mid-December.
  • A company just had its Director of IT Infrastructure give notice that she is going to work for a competitor.
  • The company doesn’t have a viable internal candidate to back-fill the role.
  • There are some major infrastructure projects in the works that must move forward.

Is this company going to wait until after the New Year to fill the role? Not if it can help it. The company is going to fill the position quickly. But around this time every year, I get calls from clients saying that they’ve been advised to wait until January to conduct their job search because that’s when more candidates are active.

So, because everyone else is waiting until January, you should too? I don’t think so. Go back to the law of supply and demand. If you wait until everyone else is conducting a job search to conduct your own, you’re competing in a market with supply that is higher than demand. That’s not ideal. You actually put yourself in a better position by conducting your search during a time in which others are not. It’s now mid-December, so get yourself out there now when competition is low and you can position yourself as a top-level candidate.

Stephen Van Vreede

About Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical resume writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and innovation leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy. Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, feel free to schedule a complimentary 30-minute consult call below:

Your Job Search & Networking: It’s not that you can’t, it’s that…

Recently, Thomas came to us recognizing he needed help in his job search. He wanted a senior-level Software Development position in Europe (he was currently located in the US) and really had no contacts there. He also realized that he had only about 10 hours a week to spend on his job search and most of that was after hours. After a month of two of trying to look on his own, with his limited time, he decided if he was ever going to achieve his goal, he needed help. Thomas partnered with us first through our résumé portfolio approach and then through our “concierge” job search solutions to help build his network in Europe.

Thanks to our large and responsive pipeline of connections, we were able to connect him to several “insiders” in companies he was targeting in his search.

After a few months of building relationships with these contacts, he was invited for an interview and was offered a position. Success!
Here is how Thomas described his experience:

“Instead of using up all my job search time just trying to find the right contacts, I spent that time responding to all those connections you made for me. I know I would not have found these contacts on my own.”

This is what partnership and “pipeline” building are all about.

Most of us professionals know that the most effective job search methodology today is still “networking”. But it takes a lot of time. Like Thomas, it is time you most likely don’t have. If you work 50-60 hours a week, you probably also want to have some work–life balance…catch your kid’s soccer game and get that project done around the house. This is understandable!

Time is our most precious commodity. And it is why we at ITtechExec will partner with you to be part of your job search “team.”

networkingJust looking for a recruiter who will talk to you and tossing your résumé on a job board aren’t enough anymore. Maybe it worked in the 90s and early 2000s when you were last out in the job market, but in today’s global marketplace, “pounding the pavement” has taken on a whole new meaning.

You need someone on your side. Think of it this way: When you check into a hotel or are lugging your baggage through the terminal, isn’t it beneficial and good to have someone there willing to assist you in your “job” at hand? It’s not that you can’t do it yourself, it’s that it’s nice to know you don’t have to carry the burden alone.

As Thomas put it:

“I thought I knew how to look for a job. I mean, this was not my first ‘rodeo’. I’ve been out in the workplace for 25 years. But my life is different now, and the market is different. And although there are a lot of tools and information out there, you can spend all of your time just sifting through it. I’m glad I recognized I needed help. This wasn’t a quick-fix solution. It still took time to find the right fit, but now I had a ‘team’ behind me, and my time was much better spent!”

So how is your pipeline?

If you know you need to build a better pipeline of connections, let us save you the legwork. We will get you in touch with the “insiders” within your target companies and provide you with some other employers you may not have considered. Networking within the current workforce of these target companies is a great way to get an employee referral and learn the culture, issues, and opportunities within the company. You can leverage your “insiders” to know about positions before they are published, and if you uncover an opportunity you are interested in, you can learn more by asking them directly.

Remember: It is not that you can’t, it’s that you don’t have to!

If you would like more information on how to use your road map , without so much recalculating, text me at 866-294-1324 to start a dialogue OR schedule a time (see below) to speak with me and learn more about our “concierge” job search solutions:

IT career adviser 5Sue Sacco is a Certified Job Search Strategist (CJSS) for ITtechExec who blends a unique background in managing both IT and telecom day-to-day operations with extensive hiring and recruitment experience for small/mid-sized organizations as well as for a prominent Fortune 1000 company. She is also a Career Thought Leader Associate.

Sue has been up close and personal with HR and has had to wade through layoffs, acquisitions, and corporate restructuring. (That means she’s a veteran of the job market zoo and has been so deep in corporate goo that nothing surprises her anymore!)

Text me at 866-294-1324 to start a dialogue OR schedule a time below to speak with me and learn more about our “concierge” job search solutions:

 

CTOs and CIOs: Transitioning from Keeping the Lights On to Investing in Innovation and Disruptive Technologies

CTOs and CIOs: Transitioning from Keeping the Lights On to Investing in Innovation and Disruptive Technologies

realized-1238069When a senior technology executive (CIO, CTO, SVP of IT, Head of Development, etc.) talks to me, it’s because they are interested in making a job change or seeing what’s out there in the job market at the least. The overwhelming factor is the frustration they feel with their current company. After all, their passion is being able to leverage technologies to transform the business, revolutionize the customer experience, and deliver breakthrough capabilities that give the company a distinct competitive advantage. But many companies handcuff their CTOs and stifle innovation because they are not willing to invest or have assumed a completely risk-averse posture when it comes to technology. They’d rather do what everyone else in their field is doing and play catch-up, which reminds me of a story.

What’s Everyone Else Doing?

I have a close friend that is the head of technology for a mid-sized company providing professional services in the financial sector. He is a forward thinker and very strategic in the way he approaches technology acquisition. But he understands how the business leadership thinks, so he’s extremely pragmatic in what he recommends and presents for his technology roadmap. Even so, the rest of the executive team thwarts any attempt to be a leader with innovation. Many years ago, he delivered a detailed strategy to consolidate and virtualize their data center environment and to create a private Cloud for their business applications. No dice! But, three years later, when their buddies who were executives at competing firms talked about their plan to go to a virtual data center and put their applications in the Cloud, it was suddenly a top priority.

You’ve Heard This Story Before

Sound familiar? I thought so.

It’s time to do it right and find an organization that doesn’t just talk innovation but actually puts their money where their mouth is and invests in emerging technologies. Don’t get me wrong, running an IT operation that’s lean and stable is an admirable thing, but is that why you got into this business? To run a cost center with a shrinking budget, zero ability to contribute to the growth of the organization, and the scapegoat for most of the problems in the company?

You’ve come too far and have too much yet to give to simply sit back and just make sure that you keep the lights on in IT. There are plenty of aggressive up-and-comers at the next level down who are willing to take on these types of roles until they’ve arrived and been-there-done-that long enough to realize they’re not doing what they love either.

Protect Your Legacy

To protect what you’ve built in your career so far and to continue to fuel your passion until you retire, you deserve to discover the opportunities that are available. Despite what it seems, there are companies out there that are market leaders and willing to invest in the development or early adoption of disruptive technologies. It takes a focused effort to identify them, engage them, and present a brand image that is appealing to them.

Build Your Support Team

To be successful in this endeavor, enlisting a team of experts to collaborate with you and support you is a great approach. This includes building your brand message and articulating it effectively in your Executive Resume, LinkedIn Profile, Executive Bio, and other materials. But it’s more than that. These market leaders are going to be highly selective, so developing viable channels or inroads into these companies is vital.

 

About Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. Some people just write résumés; he cares about the whole job search. Servings as a Job Search Recruiting Agent, he provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and innovation leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy. Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreedeTo see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, text “STUCK” to 866-294-1324 to start a dialogue OR click on the calendar below to schedule a free 30-minute résumé assessment:


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I can't believe it. I spent hours and hours trying to write my own resume. What you delivered is beyond my greatest expectations. I can't thank you enough!

Kevin K., Technical Sales Leader Atlanta, GA Technical Sales Resume Makeover January 2, 2015

This resume is outstanding! You were able to pinpoint my key skills and present them concisely.

Peter A., IT Engineer Memphis, TN Outstanding IT Resume Makeover January 2, 2015

I think the resume and LinkedIn profile are perfect! I can't thank you enough for your hard work on this

Joe G., IT Data Center Director Long Island, NY IT Resume and LinkedIn Profile Revamp January 2, 2015

3 Ways to Get Your First CIO or CTO Job

3 Ways to Get Your First CIO or CTO Job

Breaking into the CIO or CTO ranks is challenging. But people do it…the question most people have is “How?”CIO

To better understand how, it’s important to know why it is so difficult to land that first CIO or CTO position.

  1. There are a limited number of C-level opportunities (CIO, CTO, CxO)
  2. The number of candidates at the VP, Director, or Senior Manager level waiting to get their chance to head up the technology organization is at least an order of magnitude greater that the number of available roles
  3. Most larger companies expect to interview candidates who have already served as a CIO or CTO with another firm

OK, so that leaves out the possibility for jumping directly to a C-level role at a Fortune 500 company, but what about all those small and medium-sized businesses, start-ups, early-stage firms, and private companies? That certainly will be your target if you want to be successful. Now, let’s look at the 3 most common methods used to pursue one of these roles.

CIO Job Boards

There are hundreds of places to find CIO or CTO jobs posted online. These include Dice, LinkedIn, Career Builder, and Monster, as well as executive subscription sites like BlueSteps or Execunet. The paid sites offer the advantage of less competition, so there can be some value-add there. But C-level roles posted at free sites are highly competitive because of the sheer volume of people who respond…many of whom aren’t remotely qualified.

Recommendation: Join one premium site and use the public sites mostly for researching companies, their competitors, and the market in general.

Technology Recruiters

Recruiters are the be-all-end-all for senior executive roles, right? Not always. Only 4% of all positions are filled through recruiters (slightly higher for executives). Recruiters will typically not pursue candidates that aren’t already at the level for the role they are recruiting for. However, smaller companies will sometimes provide the recruiter with a desired candidate profile that includes people in the next tier down at a large corporation or working for a direct competitor.

Recommendation: Connect with recruiters, focusing on those that work with small and mid-sized companies. You can work with more than one recruiter at a time (and should). But don’t allow this to take up all of the time that you devote to the job search.

Executive Networking

You’ve heard it before…and I’ll say it again…networking is the most important thing that you can do to break into the ranks as a CIO or CTO, and it’s not even close. Industry research indicates that more than 70% of all executive positions are secured through networking. Here are the things that I hear most frequently when I tell candidates to network:

  • It’s too hard
  • It takes too much time
  • I can’t stand it
  • I’m introverted, so I’m not very good at it
  • I don’t have enough connections
  • I don’t have the right connections

Recommendation: Yes! Do it…but you’ve got to go about it the right way so that you don’t burn your network and ruin your opportunity to make a dormant network active for you.

Look, you don’t have to be a used car salesman type of person to make networking work for you. But there is a methodology that works, even for the most introverted person out there. If this is you, and you want help putting things into motion, schedule an appointment with me and we can get you on the path to success with networking.

But first, there’s one more thing that impacts your ability to land your first CIO or CTO role…

Positioning

No matter how you come across opportunities — job boards, recruiters, or networking — the manner in which you present yourself is a huge factor in determining where things go from there. That presentation has everything to do with positioning or a host of other terms that are used to describe it today (messaging, branding, etc.). The resume and LinkedIn profile are key, as they are typically the initial presentation of your skills and experience that people see. But it goes well beyond that to creating a portfolio that differentiates you from the pack…taking your candidacy from good to great!

Take Action

  • To schedule a free consult call with me, click on the link for my online calendar.
  • Learn more about our comprehensive U.S. CIO Recruiter Directory with 850+ names, emails, phone #s, and address…all instantly downloadable for just $49. Click here.
  • Check out the video on this post on YouTube.

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

2 Resume Secrets for the Aspiring CIO or CTO

2 Resume Secrets for the Aspiring CIO or CTO

2014 CIO Resume Sample_Page_1The market is full of Technology Directors and IT Leaders hoping to break into the C-level ranks as a CIO or CTO. The problem is that demand far outpaces supply, making each CIO or CTO opportunity highly competitive. Naturally, every company wants “the best” candidate. But what does “the best” mean? And are you positioning yourself as the best possible CIO or CTO candidate?

The Secret Sauce for Your CIO Resume

There are many factors that go into how companies evaluate “the best” technology executives. It’s ok, you don’t need to guess what those factors are. You just need to consider what type of organization you want to be a part of and what type of leader you want to be.

Secret CIO / CTO Resume Ingredient #1

Call it “culture” or “environment” or anything else. Either way, the chemistry that you form with a company that employs you is important. No, really…it’s very important. Did you know that you can filter out a lot of opportunities that won’t be a good fit by how you position yourself in the resume or your LinkedIn profile? Well, you can. It’s not limiting either, but freeing.

Think about it. Have you ever gone through the hiring process with a company – dealt with the recruiter, completed several rounds of interviews, managed negotiations – before realizing that the culture isn’t what you’re looking for? Or even worse, you think everything is great and the company suddenly tells you they’re going to pass because you’re not a “good fit”?
That’s really frustrating…and your time is valuable, so don’t waste it.

Secret CIO / CTO Resume Ingredient #2

What type of leader are you or do you aspire to be? I speak with a lot of prospective CIO candidates that are tired of operating in a keep-the-lights-on environment that requires a command-and-control leadership style. Instead, they want to be a leader that builds a truly collaborative environment where people’s ideas and perspectives are valued.

That doesn’t mean the company chases down every stray idea each employee comes up with. But it does foster an environment in which employees understand how what they do impacts the business and encourages them to consider ways to improve how the business works.

If this is the type of leader that you are, don’t you think that it’s important to communicate that to your audience…executive recruiters, CEOs, and COOs? I do. In fact, using this strategy has helped the CIO and CTO candidates I’ve worked with be viewed as “the best” by many companies, including start-ups, mid-sized companies, and Fortune 500 corporations.

Take Action

  • To schedule a free consult call with me, click on the link for my online calendar.
  • Learn more about our comprehensive U.S. CIO Recruiter Directory with 850+ names, emails, phone #s, and address…all instantly downloadable for just $49. Click here.

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (Nodd
lePlace
) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

The Sustainable Career

The Sustainable Career

covey

Some people wonder why it seems like others are always catching breaks at work…getting a promotion or being recruited for an exciting new opportunity. For those who excel, it usually has to do with a single decision made, committed to, and executed over the course of their career.

The Decision

What’s that decision? Simply put, it is the decision to invest in their future, to bring a passion to their place of work every day, to understand their value, and to know how their contributions impact the business at large.

“C’mon, you can’t be serious!” I know, you see evidence all around you of those who are getting ahead without giving one moment’s thought to these things. You’re right, but I would contend that these people aren’t becoming true leaders or giants in the industry. Instead, they’re just focused on nudging their way to the head of the peloton (in cycling, that’s the main pack of riders that cluster usually well behind the leaders). If you would characterize those you’re thinking about as image-conscious and, as my 11-year-old daughter likes to say, “one-uppers” then you’re spot on.

Is That What You Want Too?

Honestly, can you say that’s what you aspire to? Don’t you want to be great…not just fake things so everyone thinks you’re great but to actually be great?

If so, begin by making the decision today to invest in yourself and be passionate about what you do. There are so many ways to investment in you soundly. The typical fallback is another degree or certification. Those are fine but they do little in the way of helping you to understand who you are, what you want, what you have to offer, and how an organization should value your current and future potential.

That’s where building your brand image comes in. Not an illusion or false image, but a genuine representation of you in a form (resume, LinkedIn, bio, in-person) that resonates with executives internally and at prospective new companies.

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (Nodd
lePlace
) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

Supply & Demand: A Relevant Concept for Today’s IT/Technical Job Search?

Supply & Demand: A Relevant Concept for Today’s IT/Technical Job Search?

If you’ve read any of my other content, you know that I like to challenge “conventional” wisdom and go against the grain from what most people are saying. It’s not because I want to be a rebel, but the truth doesn’t change because the opinion of the majority says so. (Simply put, it makes me want to declare what is true and real all the more boldly!)

So what myth am I busting today? Well, it has everything to do with laws of supply and demand, which generally define the effect that the availability of a product (supply) and the desire for that product (demand) have on the price of that product. Here is a simple supply/demand chart (courtesy of Investopedia.com):

economics5

What most people get wrong in this scenario is that you, the job seeker, are the supplier. After all, the company doing the hiring is paying whomever they hire to provide a product or service, which is the work performed. When the volume of products on the supply side is higher than the demand for those products, prices get driven down until suppliers bow out and equilibrium occurs. So, in this scenario, when there is a large number of candidates available on the market, then the company looking to hire can have its pick…and possibly get that person at a price below the typical market value.

How does this go against conventional wisdom, you ask? Well, let me lay out the following scenario:

  • It is mid-November
  • A company just had its Director of IT Infrastructure give notice that he or she is going to work for a competitor
  • The company doesn’t have a viable internal candidate to back-fill the role
  • There are some major infrastructure projects in the works that must move forward

Is this company going to wait until after the New Year to fill the role? Of course not. It’s going to fill the position quickly. But around this time every year, I get calls from clients saying that they’ve been advised to wait until January to conduct their job search because that’s when more candidates are active.

So, because everyone else is waiting until January, you should too? I don’t think so. Go back to the law of supply and demand. If you wait until everyone else is conducting a job search to conduct your own, you’re competing in a market with supply that is higher than demand. That’s not ideal. You actually put yourself in a better position by conducting your search during a time in which others are not. It’s now mid-November, so get yourself out there now when competition is low and you can position yourself as a top-level candidate.

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

Kick in the Pants: 5 Signs You’re Going To Get a Job Offer

Kick in the Pants: 5 Signs You’re Going To Get a Job Offer

When you’re a job seeker, there’s perhaps no greater mystery in life than how well you did during your interview. Chances are you were at least a little bit nervous. Your mind was preoccupied with all the research you did beforehand. You got up extra early to be certain you arrived on time. And you may have stayed up a little too late the night beforehand, polishing and printing your resume. It’s no wonder job candidates aren’t in the best position to evaluate their interview performance!

But let’s say you gave it your best shot, avoiding interview pitfalls and presenting the best version of yourself to your interviewers. Is there an objective way to tell whether you’re going to get the offer?

Yes and no.

Remember, you can never really know the inner workings of a company and exactly what they are looking for in a candidate until you actually get the offer and become an employee. Even the best candidates with charming personalities and perfect qualifications don’t make the cut sometimes.

Still, there are a few telltale signs that are strong indicators you’ve proven that you’re the best person for the job:

They obviously know your name—and use it.

Unengaged interviewers, bored out of their minds from the tedium of interviewing, might have to take a peek at your resume to remember what your name is. If your interviewer knows your name from the start and continues to use it throughout the interview, it’s a strong sign that they were impressed by your resume and excited about the potential of working with you.

They tell you how your experience applies.

Most interviewers want you to sell yourself to them through detailed explanation of how your job history has prepared you for the role in question. But when interviewers are particularly invested in you—and are familiar with your resume—they already know how your experience applies and will tell you why you’re a great fit.

You meet the company’s movers and shakers.

If your interviewer takes you around to meet with people who weren’t on your interview list, it’s a very good sign. You’ll have to meet the rest of the team in a second or third interview anyway, so making their acquaintance on your first interview shows that you’re likely to come back.

The interview enters overtime.

When a half-day interview turns into lunch or even dinner, you’ve obviously proven yourself to the company. Interviewers don’t waste valuable time on candidates they don’t consider realistic for the role. Even as little as 20 or 30 extra minutes in an interview can be a great sign.

They ask when you can start.

They’re not the same words as “you’re hired,” but they might as well be. Interviewers who ask about your availability are already picturing you as part of their team. If the topic of start dates comes up in your interview, congratulations—you’ve made a big impression on the company, and you’re practically guaranteed a spot on the short list for their new hire!

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

5 Signs You’ve Outgrown Your Job

5 Signs You’ve Outgrown Your Job

toon944Having a job that’s easy, high-paying, and totally free from stress sounds too good to be true—but it can also be a sign that you’ve outgrown your job.

For IT and tech workers, the sky is truly the limit to just how far your career can go. People in the industry have active, creative minds that want to be put to great use, solving complex problems and making the world a better place. Nobody wants to waste your brilliant mind in a role that doesn’t demand the best of you. That’s why it’s vital to watch out for the signs of outgrowing your job—and remember, it can sneak up on you faster than you realize.

1 You aren’t challenged anymore.

Work that’s too easy gets old, fast. If you’re not being asked to stretch your abilities, you’ll stagnate instead of grow, which can actually hurt you if you want to take on a more challenging role down the road.

2 You’ve perfected your role and workflow.

Have you automated your tasks and condensed your week’s work into a fraction of the hours it’s supposed to take? It’s time to move on and put those hours you’ve saved to good use.

3 You’re doing way more than your job description.

Managers often ask workers to perform at a higher level for a period of time before giving them a promotion. If you’ve essentially been doing another job for more than six months, it’s time you got a new title—and a raise.

4 You’re bored to death.

Life is too short (and too interesting) to spend time bored. Watching the second hand on the clock? It’s time to move onwards and upwards.

5 You know you could do so much more.

Do you feel constrained by what you’re “allowed” to do as part of your job? Do you see ways you could improve things, but you keep hitting roadblocks from your superiors? It’s time to take that ambition and use it to get yourself a shiny new job—one that asks a lot of you and recognizes you for your amazing contributions.

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

How Social Media Can Revolutionize Your Job Search

How Social Media Can Revolutionize Your Job Search

social mediaMost hires are made due to a personal connection made through friends, coworkers, or recruiters — but today, many of these relationships take place online more than they do in person. That’s where social media comes in. By using the right online networks to connect with the people who matter most to your job hunt, you’ll find great opportunities, speed up your search, and have the potential to land a better gig than you could have the old-fashioned way.

What will social media do to your job search?

Easily build up your network of contacts and keep in touch.

Bye-bye Rolodex, hello Twitter. Keep up to date with your professional contacts online to let them know what you’re working on — and to share your success stories.

Let your network know exactly what you’re looking for.

The first step to getting what you want is asking for it. Post a brief, casual, professional-sounding note to your network of choice. Somebody out there might just be able to hook you up with a great opportunity.

Learn about the people who will be interviewing you.

A little due diligence on LinkedIn goes a long way. While you don’t want to seem like a stalker (that’s why sticking to LinkedIn is a good idea), you can learn the relevant facts about your interviewers, making you seem extra prepared.

Prove your expertise online.

Answering questions on websites like Quora.com or LinkedIn.com show that you have a wealth of knowledge and the generosity to share. That’s a very good thing when an employer looks you up online.

Get valuable information about the companies where you’d love to work.

By following companies you admire, you’ll learn more about how they do business — and how they hire. Some companies only post job openings to their social media accounts, so be sure not to miss them!

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!