Category: Job Promotion

What Do Swim Meets and Career Management Have in Common?

What Do Swim Meets and Career Management Have in Common?

My daughter Olive is 14 and is on her 5th year of competitive swimming. She is, I can proudly say, without a doubt, one of the hardest working, most committed kids in our area (can you picture my chest puffing out? Haha). She doesn’t miss a practice, a meet, an opportunity to get better. You name it, she is there, spending hours upon hours per week in the pool AND she is happy to be there. (I’m not going to lie..Sheree and I tried everything to get her interested in other things, as this was not in our plan for her, and although she is already an accomplished flute player for one of our music schools, she doesn’t love it the way she loves the water.)

But despite all of her dedication, hard work, amazing swim technique, bright future, and so on, Olive has one problem:

She sometimes loses confidence when she needs it the most.

As I mentioned, the dedication is there. The desire is there. The work ethic is there. She posts good swim times at races, is considered a solid performer, but she has this tendency to hold back a little, doubt herself. She’s so analytical, technical even, that she’s acutely aware of her shortcomings.

And because of that, she can pull back when she is supposed to be surging ahead.

It’s a frustrating place for her to be, especially when she is putting in so much time. It keeps her from getting the ROI she should be getting. Some other, less dedicated swimmers are able to keep pace with her. As a result, she feels like she is spinning her wheels.

Now, obviously, she is a teenage girl. Discovering who you are, untangling your web of emotions, fighting against inevitable comparisons, and finding confidence amid your strengths and limitations is all part of that confusing time in life.

BUT, when you think about your career management, can you relate a little?

I can. While giving her one of my little “pep” talks recently (can you see her teenage eyes rolling?), it hit me that I have had many times even in my adult life when I have done the same thing. I’ve pulled back when I should have been surging ahead, all because I got some notion in my head that I wasn’t good enough or perfect enough or the timing wasn’t exactly right or maybe I needed more education.

As a result, my ROI hasn’t always been what it should have been.

Now, of course, there is much more to life than swim times, and our careers are not the only priority, nor should they be. Much like Olive, there are many valuable lessons to be learned beyond just results. But, let’s face it, we do want to reach our potential, don’t we? Or at least get close. After all, our livelihoods do matter. And we spend a fair amount of our lives at our professions. (Ambition and a competitive drive do not make us bad people!)

The main purpose behind our VIP memberships is to help our clients achieve better ROI, to provide the support to surge ahead and not pull back. Much like Olive continues to need good coaching support, and pep talks from dad (although she may not admit that part), we too as professionals often need the same type of encouragement.

We can’t just say we want it, show up, hope it happens….we have to face whatever it is that holds us back and take a new approach to conquering it!

(I told you I’ve been inhaling a lot of chlorine lately…haha…but seriously, our goal here is to help you keep moving forward, even when you aren’t in “active” mode. If it is a confidence boost, a sounding board, a hearty shove, whatever you find you need, I hope you will reach out to us along the way…that is what we are here for!)

Two Career Roads Diverged, and I Cannot Decide

In 2014, I wrote a blog post titled “Two Roads Diverged in Your Career Path Woods…and You?” in which I played off of Robert Frost’s famous poem to look at how often we get hung up in life (and thus career) on the ins and outs of making that next step when sometimes all we need to do is just, well, make a step, any step.

I was once again pondering all this recently when I was speaking with a college assistance planner in regard to my daughter, who is about to enter high school. I was discussing how as parents, my wife and I were findings our heads collectively spinning when it came to all the hoops that supposedly needed to be jumped through, and all the boxes that supposedly needed to be checked, when it came to improving her chances amidst college rejection rates that seem to be at an all time high. “How many AP classes can she handle over the next 4 years?” “How many times will she need to take the ACT and SAT, and should she take SAT subject tests?” “By age 18, will she have mapped out her entire life plan and seen enough of the world so she can write some highly philosophical entry essay?”

Yikes…

Obviously, like many parents before us, we want what’s best for our daughter. We want to believe that we are giving her the best guidance and the best opportunities. And, yes, obviously, we are willing to get educated on what’s happening out there and get advice. But, what we’ve found is that there is a point where knowledge and advice can only go so far and you have to stop and ask, “What is our end goal, really?”

In other words, you have to stop chasing and start building.

Of course, you don’t reject all the advice and ignore all the hoops. Some of it is practical, a necessity, a fact of life (SAT scores do matter, for instance, especially if attending a selective college is important to you), but you carefully begin to pick and choose the path you want to follow based on who you are, not on what others say you have to be.

If you don’t, you will go crazy competing against a scale in which you will never measure up.

Naturally, as parenting usually does, all of this got me thinking about my own life and career path. How many times have I just been chasing instead of building?

Over the years, I’ve written about the “rat race”…the allure of it…the constant worry that you aren’t checking off all the right boxes, that the image you’ve built isn’t quite what it should be. We all fall victim to it at some point. We end up on this never ending cycle of playing “keep up” or “catch up”, and it seems like we have little control.

We seem to be living in a world that is a bit out of control.

Certainly I’ve seen this with my technical management clients. They think of personal branding as a mold or structure that they have to squeeze into in order to be “accepted”. In reality, usually what makes personal branding effective is someone who knows how to crack the mold a bit, so to speak.

It’s a frustrating place for those who’ve spent a lifetime chasing the hoops and boxes, maybe even feeling a great sense of accomplishment in having done so. The structure is comforting. It gives you a formula, a direction.

The problem, of course, is that if you’re not careful, it can also make you somewhat indistinguishable from all the other candidates out there.

One role I see this happen with the most is in Project Management. There are so many project managers these days with PMP certifications, it can be tough to separate out from the crowd. Another is Engineers with PE certifications. I’ve often seen it in pharmaceutical and medical device sales as well. Pretty soon the market gets flooded with candidates who are well qualified, but on paper, they don’t stand out from one another.

Often, what has happened, and we’ve all been there, is that so much time was spent trying to be the very picture of PMP or PE that once we’ve achieved it, we’ve also lost any sense of individuality.

So at some point, a decision has to be made: How do I play this game while still building my own story? What hoops do I jump through, and what ones do I skip to forge my own path?

Without doubt, it is a delicate balance. But it is choice that can make all the difference.

About Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. Some people just write résumés; he cares about the whole job search. Serving as a Job Search Recruiting Agent, he provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and innovation leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy. Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreedeTo see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, text “STUCK” to 866-294-1324 to start a dialogue OR click on the calendar below to schedule a free 30-minute résumé assessment:

Not Enough Time for Your Next Career Move?

Are you a professional that feels pressure to find job search time? You know it is time to go, but you can’t see how you can get it all done. After all, you likely work 50-60 or more hours per week and have other obligations, like family.

Do you find yourself wondering:

“Where will I fit in job search time to my already crazy schedule? After all I want to find and sustain my work/life balance! It’s important that I watch my kids grow up. But I know it’s time for me to start looking for the next role. So how can I find the time I need to make this next career move?”
As our client Joshua found out, you can have victory over your job search time management. He was aware of a downsizing move coming to his company so he took the time before that happened to prepare for his next IT Director position. While he was getting his résumé designed with us, he participated in our complimentary Job Move Strategy session.
When I first met Joshua, he was stressed out by the idea of making this career move and still having time to be with his family. Like most of us, his life is more than just about work. He has a wife and 3 children that are very active. He commutes over an hour a day, and he coaches his daughter’s soccer team on weekends. Talk about work/life juggling!
Together, he and I were able to incorporate clear strategic methodologies into his job search approach. After prioritizing each method to focus his job search time appropriately, he was able to get noticed, get interviews, and get a new position.

Here is the strategy we designed for Joshua to move toward achieving this victory!

• Recruiters: Joshua did not have the time to research and vet which recruiters would be most effective for him. So I took that burden off of him and did the legwork. Once we narrowed down recruiters to contact, I then reached out on his behalf and began making introductions. This way, Joshua only had to respond to those recruiters who were interested and used his time more effectively.
• Target Companies: Joshua had some parameters in mind for his next company, but he needed some help targeting which ones fit those parameters. Once again, I did the research to present the companies to Joshua and vetted key contacts across our extensive ITtechExec network at those companies.
• Networking (both within and outside your network): Joshua had a pretty large network on LinkedIn and elsewhere, but he found his contacts to be unmotivated in helping him get going with his job search. After some discussion, he discovered that some of the problem had to the do with the way he was approaching them. After some coaching with me, he began to have a much better response. He also took advantage of our ITtechExec network to connect with new contacts who might be helpful in achieving his goal.

In the end, although it wasn’t an overnight success, Joshua did find that a job search doesn’t have to be overwhelming.

Here’s how he described it:
“Sue, before we started putting this strategy together, I was lost. I knew I had to act, but I couldn’t get passed the idea that my life was so hectic. Not only did you give me practical support, but you also gave me direction.”
If you find yourself out in the wilderness, wondering where to even begin with your next career move, text me at 866-294-1324 to start a dialogue OR click on the calendar below to schedule a free consult. We will present a customized strategy for your search and share how we will partner with you to maintain your work/life balance during your job search just like we did for Joshua and his busy family.

 

IT career adviser 5Sue Sacco is a Certified Job Search Strategist (CJSS) for ITtechExec who blends a unique background in managing both IT and telecom day-to-day operations with extensive hiring and recruitment experience for small/mid-sized organizations as well as for a prominent Fortune 1000 company. She is also a Career Thought Leader Associate.

Sue has been up close and personal with HR and has had to wade through layoffs, acquisitions, and corporate restructuring. (That means she’s a veteran of the job market zoo and has been so deep in corporate goo that nothing surprises her anymore!)

Text me at 866-294-1324 to start a dialogue OR schedule a time below to speak with me and learn more about our “concierge” job search solutions:

2 Resume Secrets for the Aspiring CIO or CTO

2 Resume Secrets for the Aspiring CIO or CTO

2014 CIO Resume Sample_Page_1The market is full of Technology Directors and IT Leaders hoping to break into the C-level ranks as a CIO or CTO. The problem is that demand far outpaces supply, making each CIO or CTO opportunity highly competitive. Naturally, every company wants “the best” candidate. But what does “the best” mean? And are you positioning yourself as the best possible CIO or CTO candidate?

The Secret Sauce for Your CIO Resume

There are many factors that go into how companies evaluate “the best” technology executives. It’s ok, you don’t need to guess what those factors are. You just need to consider what type of organization you want to be a part of and what type of leader you want to be.

Secret CIO / CTO Resume Ingredient #1

Call it “culture” or “environment” or anything else. Either way, the chemistry that you form with a company that employs you is important. No, really…it’s very important. Did you know that you can filter out a lot of opportunities that won’t be a good fit by how you position yourself in the resume or your LinkedIn profile? Well, you can. It’s not limiting either, but freeing.

Think about it. Have you ever gone through the hiring process with a company – dealt with the recruiter, completed several rounds of interviews, managed negotiations – before realizing that the culture isn’t what you’re looking for? Or even worse, you think everything is great and the company suddenly tells you they’re going to pass because you’re not a “good fit”?
That’s really frustrating…and your time is valuable, so don’t waste it.

Secret CIO / CTO Resume Ingredient #2

What type of leader are you or do you aspire to be? I speak with a lot of prospective CIO candidates that are tired of operating in a keep-the-lights-on environment that requires a command-and-control leadership style. Instead, they want to be a leader that builds a truly collaborative environment where people’s ideas and perspectives are valued.

That doesn’t mean the company chases down every stray idea each employee comes up with. But it does foster an environment in which employees understand how what they do impacts the business and encourages them to consider ways to improve how the business works.

If this is the type of leader that you are, don’t you think that it’s important to communicate that to your audience…executive recruiters, CEOs, and COOs? I do. In fact, using this strategy has helped the CIO and CTO candidates I’ve worked with be viewed as “the best” by many companies, including start-ups, mid-sized companies, and Fortune 500 corporations.

Take Action

  • To schedule a free consult call with me, click on the link for my online calendar.
  • Learn more about our comprehensive U.S. CIO Recruiter Directory with 850+ names, emails, phone #s, and address…all instantly downloadable for just $49. Click here.

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (Nodd
lePlace
) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

The Sustainable Career

The Sustainable Career

covey

Some people wonder why it seems like others are always catching breaks at work…getting a promotion or being recruited for an exciting new opportunity. For those who excel, it usually has to do with a single decision made, committed to, and executed over the course of their career.

The Decision

What’s that decision? Simply put, it is the decision to invest in their future, to bring a passion to their place of work every day, to understand their value, and to know how their contributions impact the business at large.

“C’mon, you can’t be serious!” I know, you see evidence all around you of those who are getting ahead without giving one moment’s thought to these things. You’re right, but I would contend that these people aren’t becoming true leaders or giants in the industry. Instead, they’re just focused on nudging their way to the head of the peloton (in cycling, that’s the main pack of riders that cluster usually well behind the leaders). If you would characterize those you’re thinking about as image-conscious and, as my 11-year-old daughter likes to say, “one-uppers” then you’re spot on.

Is That What You Want Too?

Honestly, can you say that’s what you aspire to? Don’t you want to be great…not just fake things so everyone thinks you’re great but to actually be great?

If so, begin by making the decision today to invest in yourself and be passionate about what you do. There are so many ways to investment in you soundly. The typical fallback is another degree or certification. Those are fine but they do little in the way of helping you to understand who you are, what you want, what you have to offer, and how an organization should value your current and future potential.

That’s where building your brand image comes in. Not an illusion or false image, but a genuine representation of you in a form (resume, LinkedIn, bio, in-person) that resonates with executives internally and at prospective new companies.

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (Nodd
lePlace
) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

Boost Your Image to Boost Your Salary

Boost Your Image to Boost Your Salary

salary-man-wearing-suit-holding-word-his-hands-41219907I recently read a series of posts by a colleague of mine on what candidates should and should not do when negotiating a pay raise at their current company. The information was largely accurate and relevant, instructing candidates to avoid arguments that focus on fairness, need, or length of tenure while emphasizing performance and success.

After reading and reflecting on these posts, I was struck by one overwhelming thought:

This is all very logical.

Immediately, I recognized that the problem here is too much logic. Don’t get me wrong, I love logic. I fancy myself a very rational, logical thinker. Most of us examine the decisions that others make with our logic, but make decisions of our own because of feelings. Think about it logically (smile)…consider advertising campaigns. When you see an ad for something you’re not interested in, you scoff and shake your head. However, when you see an ad for something that piques your interest (like the next new gadget), you’re transfixed and suddenly willing to overlook the cheesy marketing ploys used in the ad.

The same concept applies here. You’re not going to talk yourself into a raise (not a great one, at least) by using only logical arguments.

Image Is Vital

As much as you and I may hate it, image and perception trump substance in the world of work today. Actually, this has always been true to some extent, but in this era of teamwork and collaboration, if the people around you perceive you as a poor worker or a pain to deal with, your image across the organization won’t be so hot. There are always those people that are terrible at what they do but can game the system and make people think they’re great. On the flip side, there are amazing performers that contribute a ton of value who never go anywhere because they’ve done nothing to boost their image.

How Do I Boost My Image?

There are many things you can do to boost your image. In fact, there are various layers here, making the answer really complex. However, it will probably start with changing your thinking. If you’re like me, you are able to identify the frauds and can see through every move they make. It’s obvious to everyone, right? Wrong! Most people are so busy or are caught up faking things themselves that they don’t see what’s so obvious to you. I’m not advocating being fake yourself, but evaluating what the “successful frauds” do well and learning from that. So when you add a positive perception with substantive performance, your image is going to skyrocket.

That’s when you’ll be in a powerful position to negotiate a great raise based on your positive image (the feeling you produce in others about what you offer) and the value you bring (the logical evidence giving credence to those feelings).

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

Kick in the Pants: 5 Signs You’re Going To Get a Job Offer

Kick in the Pants: 5 Signs You’re Going To Get a Job Offer

When you’re a job seeker, there’s perhaps no greater mystery in life than how well you did during your interview. Chances are you were at least a little bit nervous. Your mind was preoccupied with all the research you did beforehand. You got up extra early to be certain you arrived on time. And you may have stayed up a little too late the night beforehand, polishing and printing your resume. It’s no wonder job candidates aren’t in the best position to evaluate their interview performance!

But let’s say you gave it your best shot, avoiding interview pitfalls and presenting the best version of yourself to your interviewers. Is there an objective way to tell whether you’re going to get the offer?

Yes and no.

Remember, you can never really know the inner workings of a company and exactly what they are looking for in a candidate until you actually get the offer and become an employee. Even the best candidates with charming personalities and perfect qualifications don’t make the cut sometimes.

Still, there are a few telltale signs that are strong indicators you’ve proven that you’re the best person for the job:

They obviously know your name—and use it.

Unengaged interviewers, bored out of their minds from the tedium of interviewing, might have to take a peek at your resume to remember what your name is. If your interviewer knows your name from the start and continues to use it throughout the interview, it’s a strong sign that they were impressed by your resume and excited about the potential of working with you.

They tell you how your experience applies.

Most interviewers want you to sell yourself to them through detailed explanation of how your job history has prepared you for the role in question. But when interviewers are particularly invested in you—and are familiar with your resume—they already know how your experience applies and will tell you why you’re a great fit.

You meet the company’s movers and shakers.

If your interviewer takes you around to meet with people who weren’t on your interview list, it’s a very good sign. You’ll have to meet the rest of the team in a second or third interview anyway, so making their acquaintance on your first interview shows that you’re likely to come back.

The interview enters overtime.

When a half-day interview turns into lunch or even dinner, you’ve obviously proven yourself to the company. Interviewers don’t waste valuable time on candidates they don’t consider realistic for the role. Even as little as 20 or 30 extra minutes in an interview can be a great sign.

They ask when you can start.

They’re not the same words as “you’re hired,” but they might as well be. Interviewers who ask about your availability are already picturing you as part of their team. If the topic of start dates comes up in your interview, congratulations—you’ve made a big impression on the company, and you’re practically guaranteed a spot on the short list for their new hire!

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

Should You Talk Openly About Your Income?

Should You Talk Openly About Your Income?

salaryWhat would you do if you found out your colleagues were making significantly more than you for the exact same work?

Think back to all of those times you stayed late at the office. The skipped lunch breaks. Missed social opportunities. And especially all of those brilliant ideas of yours that helped your organization save money and work more efficiently. As a top-notch employee, you’d expect to be earning as much—or even a little more—than your peers.

Reality check: You might not be. But you’d never know it unless you talked about it.

There’s nothing like discussing salary to summon up corporate smoke and mirrors that deflect the conversation, or even prevent it from happening in the first place. It’s understandable—money is personal, and even emotional. Thinking of your value as a worker in terms of dollars and cents can feel dehumanizing and uncomfortable. Add to that the old-fashioned idea that discussing money just isn’t polite, and you’ve got radio silence when it comes to how much money you and your co-workers make.

Even worse, companies benefit hugely from propagating the myth that it’s illegal to discuss salaries. Whether it’s written into the contract that you sign upon hiring or gently discouraged by your HR manager, many corporations don’t want you discussing how much you make with fellow employees. After all, if you find out that they’re making more than you, you might ask them for more money.

Sound fishy to you? It is.

In a large majority of cases, it is absolutely legal to discuss your salary with your coworkers. You don’t need to be part of a union, and you don’t need to be a government employee. Though certain workers are exempt from this law (such as supervisors and independent contractors), roles are sometimes miscategorized and actually do receive legal protection for salary discussion.

Since 1935, the National Labor Relations Act has protected the right of employees to engage in discussions for mutual aid or protection—and that includes talking about salaries. The problem? Many consider the act to be weak in terms of holding companies accountable for violations. This is one reason President Obama has been working to strengthen workplace transparency and accountability, having recently signed two executive orders to do just that.

For tech and IT workers where salaries can have a very wide range, it’s crucial not to get stuck at a lower salary range than what you deserve. And for women and minorities in tech, the wage gap can spell out an average of 25 percent less earnings than non-minorities. We think that everybody deserves to be paid fairly for what they do. Don’t you?

So what can you do if you think you’re earning less than you should be?

Find out if you’re protected under the National Labor Relations Act.

Don’t assume that you aren’t! Try contacting the National Labor Relations Board if you’re unsure.

Learn the power of negotiation.

One of the major reasons for pay gaps is that some people are simply better negotiators than others. Leverage the power of a convincing argument to show what you’re worth and get a better offer.

Ask for a raise.

Are your co-workers asking for more money, but not you? Don’t hold your breath until your boss decides to give you more money. Ask for it, and you might just get it.

Don’t suffer in silence.

If you have the legal protection to do so, go ahead and talk openly about how much you’re earning and why you think it should change. It could make a major difference in your career advancement—and your bank account.

Report violations to the NLRB.

How much you earn should depend on your qualifications, not your gender, age, race, negotiating skills, or how much the boss likes you. Work against inequality and the illegal silencing of salary discussions by contacting the NLRB if necessary. You’ll not only help your own salary, but you’ll promote a more just and fair treatment for all qualified employees.

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

5 Signs You’ve Outgrown Your Job

5 Signs You’ve Outgrown Your Job

toon944Having a job that’s easy, high-paying, and totally free from stress sounds too good to be true—but it can also be a sign that you’ve outgrown your job.

For IT and tech workers, the sky is truly the limit to just how far your career can go. People in the industry have active, creative minds that want to be put to great use, solving complex problems and making the world a better place. Nobody wants to waste your brilliant mind in a role that doesn’t demand the best of you. That’s why it’s vital to watch out for the signs of outgrowing your job—and remember, it can sneak up on you faster than you realize.

1 You aren’t challenged anymore.

Work that’s too easy gets old, fast. If you’re not being asked to stretch your abilities, you’ll stagnate instead of grow, which can actually hurt you if you want to take on a more challenging role down the road.

2 You’ve perfected your role and workflow.

Have you automated your tasks and condensed your week’s work into a fraction of the hours it’s supposed to take? It’s time to move on and put those hours you’ve saved to good use.

3 You’re doing way more than your job description.

Managers often ask workers to perform at a higher level for a period of time before giving them a promotion. If you’ve essentially been doing another job for more than six months, it’s time you got a new title—and a raise.

4 You’re bored to death.

Life is too short (and too interesting) to spend time bored. Watching the second hand on the clock? It’s time to move onwards and upwards.

5 You know you could do so much more.

Do you feel constrained by what you’re “allowed” to do as part of your job? Do you see ways you could improve things, but you keep hitting roadblocks from your superiors? It’s time to take that ambition and use it to get yourself a shiny new job—one that asks a lot of you and recognizes you for your amazing contributions.

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says It’s Never Too Late To Start A Career In Tech

IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says It’s Never Too Late To Start A Career In Tech

CEO of ITtechExec Stephen Van Vreede encourages professionals interested in transitioning into tech careers to hop right in and start learning — there are plenty of high-paying jobs to go around.

Rochester, NY — June 17, 2015 — Stephen Van Vreede, CEO of ITtechExec, published a new article titled “How to Transition to a Career In Tech.” In the article, he explains that due to the tech industry boom, many working adults are starting and succeeding at second careers in tech through dedicated learning, work, and practice, but not necessarily another degree.

Van Vreede says, “Today, everybody is getting a lot more techy — from young students to senior managers. Jobs that were once clearly non-technical are being filled by qualified candidates who know how to code in addition to the other skills they bring to the table … This is why if you are interested in tech, it’s a great idea to pick up new skills and learn how to use them on your current job. And if you really like using your tech know-how in a professional environment, you can start plotting a career transition that will allow you to use your new skills full-time. All it takes is a little planning.”

Stephen Van Vreede is a personal brand strategist, certified resume writer, job search agent, and the CEO and owner of ITtechExec. Stephen has 10 years of experience in employment strategy and 8 years of corporate management experience. He holds an M.B.A. in Marketing from Villanova University.

Read the entire article here. http://www.ittechexec.com/kick-in-the-pants-how-to-transition-to-a-career-in-tech/

About ITtechExec:

ITtechExec is a new kind of full-service employment agency that combines resume writing, portfolio building, and job search solutions to launch extraordinary tech careers in the 21st century job market. CEO and Executive Solutions Guide Stephen Van Vreede created ITtechExec in 2001, using his background of personal branding and corporate management to create a multi-pronged approach that gets results. ITtechExec serves as the job seeker and career changer’s trusted adviser, helping them make the best of the careers they’ve built and guiding them into the professional futures they desire.

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