Category: Recruiting

Open Letter to Corporate HR Leaders on Talent Recruitment

Open Letter to Corporate HR Leaders on Talent Recruitment

Open Letter on Talent Recruitment
War for Talent: Symptoms and Remedies

You can’t escape the sheer volume of content out there talking about the “War for Talent”. The top professional services companies (PwC, McKinsey) and the top business publications (Forbes, Harvard Business Review) have materials on winning the talent war. There are even books and Wikipedia entries focused on the War for Talent.

As a corporate or HR leader, you know what it is — the competitiveness of today’s business environment that makes attracting and retaining talented individuals increasingly difficult. I don’t need to define it any further because you’ve likely experienced it first-hand. What I want to do is list the key symptoms, address some of the root causes, and offer some non-traditional (well, let’s call them “unconventional” solutions based on the trends today) strategies to help your organization navigate this competitive talent landscape more successfully.

Key Symptoms

It’s Taking Me Longer to Fill Open Positions

A recent DHI Group study for 2016 reveals that 45% of employers indicate the time to fill open positions is growing compared to last year. In fact, the national average vacancy duration has trended upward consistently since 2009, now reaching a 15-year high. According to the companies that DHI Group surveyed, 53% cited the #1 reason for this increase in open position duration as an inability to find qualified candidates. The #2 reason was eerily similar, with 29% of respondents indicating that they were waiting for a more perfect match.

By my math, that’s 82% of the time that companies are leaving spots open longer because they are unable to find candidates that match their expectations. Let’s explore the concept of qualified candidate availability a bit further.

I Just Can’t Find Quality Talent Out There

A 2016 LinkedIn Global Recruiting Trends report cites the most valuable metric for recruiting performance is the quality of hire. The #1 obstacle to attracting top talent is finding candidates in high-demand talent pools. Coupled with the #3 obstacle, competition, the two make up 85% of the main reasons companies struggle to attract talent.

This data jives with the DHI survey. Bottom line is that the entrenched thinking in companies today is that talented candidates are simply not out there in the job market. However, a report by Jobvite revealed a 40% increase in the number of applications for each job in just a 3-year period.

My take: The numbers show that there are more candidates applying for more positions. You might struggle to find a suitable applicant quickly for a very specific role in a certain geographical location, but that should be the exception, not the norm. Houston, we have a problem!

Key Root Cause Issues

I am going to lean on my years of experience managing all of the operational aspects of an international call center, including hiring and retention, for a GE Capital Company as well as my time engaging with both hiring managers and job seekers.

Poor Candidate Search Channels

I have heard from people in corporate HR that they just can’t find good people anymore. I’ve gotten into the habit of asking them, “Where are you looking?” Most don’t really have a good answer to that one. They usually all say something very similar…with the term “social recruiting” (whatever that really means — if you want to classify posting jobs on LinkedIn, which is essentially a job board, as social recruiting, you’re fooling yourself) somewhere near the top of the list.

Inability to Identify Quality Matches

The next question I ask my friends in recruitment is “What are you looking for?” The responses here are typically things that are all good and I totally get, like people with high energy that share the vision for excellence and want to be part of a great corporate culture. But that’s missing the point, so I have to rephrase my question and ask them what tactics they are employing to find these people. Some form of keyword matching is the most prevalent thing here. This encompasses companies that seek out passive candidates on job sites or LinkedIn as well as firms that receive resumes for positions they post to the Web.

For LinkedIn, they filter candidates using the keyword search functionality on LinkedIn’s site. For actual applicants, the resumes get uploaded to an automated system (ATS), which makes them searchable for keywords. So before a candidate is identified as a possibility and their resume is even reviewed, they have to pass muster with the keyword search. I get it…you don’t want to spend time on resumes whose content doesn’t match the description of the role.

Fair enough, but when you get several dozen candidates that are a reasonable match, what information is considered about each candidate at the recruiter or HR Rep level to determine whether their information should be passed along to a decision maker? According to a 2015 Jobvite study, by far the most popular method (57%) is to focus on the length of a candidate’s average job tenure. Number two (42%) is the candidate’s length of tenure with their current employer.

Really! The most important piece of information about a candidate’s ability to do a job is how long they’ve stayed with other companies? Have there been some analytics done on this that I missed? Did they discover a strong correlation between length of tenure and ability?

I’ll grant that there may be a correlation for candidates that have had lengthy tenures in the past to desire a lengthy tenure in the future, but is length of tenure with your company the goal? Gosh, I hope not…at least not the primary goal. Quality of hire should come first, then the ability to advance and retain top-notch talent. I have seen plenty of businesses with mediocre and sub-par employees that are more than happy to stay on as long as you let them, so why is a candidate’s length of tenure so important?

In my mind, this is where most companies experience an epic fail. More on this in the section on remedies.

Bad User Experience

How companies engage with applicants is critical, both in terms of candidate willingness to seriously consider employment offers and in terms of their willingness to have any interaction as a consumer of the products or services offered by the company in the future.

According to Jobvite, 42% of candidates with a bad applicant experience would never seek employment with that company. In addition, approximately 64% of applicants will share a negative recruitment experience with friends, family, and colleagues. Conversely, 68% of candidates that view the application experience as very positive would be willing to accept an offer with a salary 5% below the low end of their target range.

Initially, that stat stunned me! After dwelling on it, I realized what was driving these numbers…culture. I read a lot of articles, blogs, and comments that talk about the importance of corporate culture…I agree that having a good culture is vital. Even if candidates aren’t able to articulate it, they understand intuitively that a vibrant culture cannot be manufactured by slogans or branding or anything else. Culture is the authentic response of all the business stakeholders to the mission, purpose, values, and focus areas that an organization pursues. For the recruitment process, that simply translates to the following message: “If you value me as a prospective employee of your organization, you’ll make sure to weigh my experience and credentials appropriately, to treat me professionalism, and to respect my time.”

One specific issue with time that comes up frequently is the time to complete an application. Many companies over-complicate the career website, adding in bells and whistles that aren’t necessary. From a candidate’s perspective, a simple, easy-to-complete application process is imperative. If it takes too long, 60% of candidates will abandon their application and never complete it. That’s a lot of people. I don’t have any stats on it, but I would venture to say that most of the would-be applicants that abandon the process are those that are gainfully employed today and spending that much time simply isn’t worth it…they may be what you would consider “optimal” applicants.

Unconventional Remedies

As a Certified Six Sigma Black Belt, I’m all about process streamlining and process automation. Whenever and wherever an opportunity to reduce cycle time and eliminate touchpoints is presented, I’m all ears. However, as a business operator, it’s vital to balance the benefits of the process improvement with any possible degradation in quality.

If a manual process is not delivering effective results, automating it just allows you to do a bad job more quickly. I think that this exact scenario is one of the primary drivers of this perceived War for Talent today. The trend has been to automate, consolidate, and centralize. I get it…now each HR Rep can support the recruitment process for more departments, even though the number of positions is increasing and the average tenure in the workforce is decreasing. This means that each HR Rep has more positions to fill at a much greater frequency than anytime in recent history.

Decentralize

Forget it…it’s not working. Your HR Rep is not equipped to handle that type of load. In fact, most HR Reps have only a vague notion of what each position really entails and what an ideal candidate truly looks like. Now you’re asking them to cast an even wider net? To me, the outcome is obvious…that wider net will allow a ton of great candidates to slip through unnoticed.

Instead, let your HR Reps run the database searches, interact with the third-party recruiter, schedule interviews, and answer questions related to policies and benefits. Put the efforts of candidate evaluation back into the hands of each business owner. I can guarantee that any worthy manager, director, or VP will assess each candidate based on their experience and value ahead of trivial things like job tenure.

Humanize

Humans relate with other humans…machines, not so much. Like I said, I love automation, but it has to be done well for it to work…and what’s in place in most major companies today is not working. In the Jobvite survey I mentioned, 56% of candidates received no communications at all about their application…NONE!

Nothing says “I don’t value you” more than no response at all. Even some generic response from a do-not-reply email account is better than that…but still pretty terrible. Go ahead and create your automated email campaign, but invite a few recent hires or even candidates that were rejected (and pay them) to help craft a human-focused communication strategy.

Top-Down People Focus

Senior executives (CxO, SVP, etc.), this is where you come in. If attracting talent is a significant problem in your group or across your entire organization, then I can guarantee you that your culture isn’t as vibrant as you need it to be. A great culture is a magnet for talent. You can overcome serious flaws in your recruitment process by having a genuinely amazing corporate culture.

Conclusion

The talent is out there ready to plucked and put to good use. Are you willing to challenge the entrenched thinking and uproot the existing recruitment paradigm in your organization? If so, then prepare yourself, because it won’t be easy. If you do it right, it will probably even cost more than it does today…at least in terms of the time required from your business unit leaders. But seriously, what is the cost to the organization if you do nothing and stay on this path? How much are you leaving on the table by missing out on the best talent out there?

If you’re not willing to challenge the status quo, then good luck to you in the War for Talent.

 

Stephen Van Vreede

About Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average executive coach and résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and innovation leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (released June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

The Real Skinny: Why Doing Good—Not Just Good Work—Matters

The Real Skinny: Why Doing Good—Not Just Good Work—Matters

Do you use your tech wizardry for good or evil?

Okay, hopefully you’re not using it for evil. But if you want to put your skills to use, you need to know that tech companies these days are looking for more than a neutral employee who does only what’s asked and goes home at the end of the day. They’re looking for innovative movers and shakers concerned about creating something that’s not just cool or clever, but also creates positive change in the world.

After all, who has more power and resources to do good than IT and tech professionals? Technology is at the root of every scalable force for good that exists in our modern times. Whether it’s as simple as advances in security systems or as complex as 3D-printed prosthetic limbs, tech is making life better for humans and the planet. It’s unstoppable—so leverage that power for your career!

But you don’t need to be a do-gooder to impress companies with your skills. It’s easier than you might think to incorporate positive change into your existing career and skill development. Ask yourself the following questions:

  • Can I make a small change in my work that makes life easier for at least one person?
  • Is there a place I can volunteer to build my skills and help others simultaneously?
  • Are there any junior employees I can mentor and positively influence?
  • Can I take my side project to the next level by incorporating socially or environmentally responsible elements?
  • Are there untapped resources I could donate to make an improvement for my company or clients?

Remember, the core mission of most companies is to make life better for people and the planet. When you show a dedication to this mission—and a white-hot skill set—you’ll make an unforgettable impression at your current and future workplaces.

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says Startup Jobs Are Harder — And More Rewarding — Than How They Are Portrayed In Media

IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says Startup Jobs Are Harder — And More Rewarding — Than How They Are Portrayed In Media

CEO of ITtechExec Stephen Van Vreede explains what it’s actually like to work in a startup, from the long working hours to the amazing workplace perks.

Rochester, NY — June 3, 2015 — Stephen Van Vreede, CEO of ITtechExec, published a new article titled “What It’s Really Like to Work At a Startup.” In the article, he reveals what startup careers look like in reality, busting the media myths of big perks and paydays and showing instead that startups provide major opportunities to share tech talent with other experts in the field.

Van Vreede says, “You can’t open a book or flip on the TV without coming face-to-face with startup workplaces these days. For the techies among us, the tidal wave of startups poses a mysterious allure. We know that in real life, they can’t possibly be as non-traditional, amusing, back-breaking, and downright absurd as they appear in the media. Or can they?”

Stephen Van Vreede is a personal brand strategist, certified resume writer, job search agent, and the CEO and owner of ITtechExec. Stephen has 10 years of experience in employment strategy and 8 years of corporate management
experience. He holds an M.B.A. in Marketing from Villanova University.

Read the entire article here. http://www.ittechexec.com/the-real-skinny-what-its-really-like-to-work-at-a-startup/

About ITtechExec:

ITtechExec is a new kind of full-service employment agency that combines resume writing, portfolio building, and job search solutions to launch extraordinary tech careers in the 21st century job market. CEO and Executive Solutions Guide Stephen Van Vreede created ITtechExec in 2001, using his background of personal branding and corporate management to create a multi-pronged approach that gets results. ITtechExec serves as the job seeker and career changer’s trusted adviser, helping them make the best of the careers they’ve built and guiding them into the professional futures they desire.

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How to Find 800+ CIO Recruiters in an Instant

How to Find 800+ CIO Recruiters in an Instant

NoddlePlace_2

Your CIO Job Search Can Be Simpler …

You Don’t Have to Do It All Yourself.

Recruiters may seem like they are everywhere, but finding the ones who specifically place CIOs like you (and in YOUR salary range) can take a lot of work.

So why not do yourself a favor? Save hours of research and frustration.

My team and I have already done most of the legwork for you.

Click Here to Learn How to Get Your U.S. CIO Recruiter Directory for $49

Better Yet, Why Not Get It for Free? Get a Free Consult, Get a Free Directory!

How’s that for simple?

uncommon the book with stephen van vreedeMy name is Stephen Van Vreede, and I am a Technical Résumé Writer and Job Search Strategist. I’m also a Technical Job Search Adviser for TechRepublic, CIO.com, and Dice, where I have been featured extensively, as well as a Co-author of the upcoming career/life development book UNCOMMON with business leader Brian Tracy (June 11, 2015).

After listening to my client members talk about their frustration in finding the right recruiters, and after hearing how much of their precious job search time they were squandering scouring LinkedIn to find a recruiter who places for the types of jobs they were looking for, I began putting together specialized directories for them, leveraging my large network of recruiters.

Now we offer those directories, such as the CIO directory, outside of our network. To top it off, we even give them away with a free 30-minute career move “prep” session with me.

You can also sign up to receive our complimentary brief called “How You Can Leverage Technical Recruiters to Build a Career Protection Pipeline” (see below).

No matter where you are in your CIO career move, we offer 3 great options:

  1. For only $49, you can get started with your CIO recruiter directory. Just click here.

  2. For 30 minutes of your time, you can have a 1-1 consult with me and receive the CIO recruiter directory for free.

  3. For a limited time, you can receive a brief presentation on “How You Can Leverage Technical Recruiters to Build a Career Protection Pipeline“:



IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says Strive For Workplace Equality Systemically And Personally

IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says Strive For Workplace Equality Systemically And Personally

CEO of ITtechExec Stephen Van Vreede discusses gender equality in tech workplaces, explaining that changes must happen at both individual and structural levels.

Rochester, NY — May 27, 2015 — Stephen Van Vreede, CEO of ITtechExec, published a new blog post titled “Women in Tech: Top 5 Career-Building Tips.” In the post, he shares with readers five ways they can build better careers in tech and IT as the world of work determines — though not quickly enough — how to hire, promote, and compensate women equally.

Van Vreede says, “There are few more important questions in tech right now than how to correct the gender imbalance in the workplace … While ideally all women in tech would be afforded equal opportunity, advancement, and compensation by their employers, that’s not everyone’s reality quite yet. This is why we’ve assembled our top five tips for women already in tech or just starting to build their careers.”

Stephen Van Vreede is a personal brand strategist, certified resume writer, job search agent, and the CEO and owner of ITtechExec. Stephen has 10 years of experience in employment strategy and 8 years of corporate management experience. He holds an M.B.A. in Marketing from Villanova University.

Read the entire article here. http://www.ittechexec.com/kick-in-the-pants-women-in-tech-top-5-career-building-tips/

About ITtechExec:

ITtechExec is a new kind of full-service employment agency that combines resume writing, portfolio building, and job search solutions to launch extraordinary tech careers in the 21st century job market. CEO and Executive Solutions Guide Stephen Van Vreede created ITtechExec in 2001, using his background of personal branding and corporate management to create a multi-pronged approach that gets results. ITtechExec serves as the job seeker and career changer’s trusted adviser, helping them make the best of the careers they’ve built and guiding them into the professional futures they desire.

 

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The Real Skinny: Why Higher-Paying Tech Jobs Are Just Around the Corner

The Real Skinny: Why Higher-Paying Tech Jobs Are Just Around the Corner

tech jobsIf you have been looking for a new or better-paying IT job, the time to find one is right now.

President Obama’s new initiative, TechHire, is a powerful indication of the present state of tech employment. As you may already know, unemployment has fallen to 5.5 percent, which still leaves about five million open jobs scattered across the country. An estimated 500,000 of those jobs are in the tech sector.

As the New York Times reports, the improvement in employment statistics hasn’t increased our disposable income as much as we had all hoped. This is one reason the Obama administration has focused on filling tech jobs. Many of the openings in IT and tech pay around 50 percent more than other types of jobs. It stands to reason that the more tech jobs get filled, the better our economy will fare.

Many of these high-paying tech jobs don’t require a four-year college degree, but they do mandate a specialized skill set. As IT and tech job candidates, there is no end to skill-building and professional development. The TechHire initiative has received a large influx of federal funding to provide training that can pave the way for tech workers to new, higher-paying jobs.

Per the TechHire website,

“IT jobs in fields like cybersecurity, network administration, coding, project management, UI design and data analytics offer pathways to middle-class careers with average salaries more than one and a half times higher than the average private-sector American job.”

Are you staying sharp? When was the last time you added to your skill set? Are you thinking ahead in terms of not months, but years? As IT and tech workers, you have the good fortune of having some of the best job opportunities in our nation — if, that is, you do everything you can to be the best candidate you can be. Take a tip from the TechHire initiative and add polish to your resume so you can find or trade up into one of the 500,000 open jobs in our country right now.

 

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

 

 

IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says Don’t Just Find a Recruiter — Help Recruiters Find You

IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says Don’t Just Find a Recruiter — Help Recruiters Find You

CEO of ITtechExec Stephen Van Vreede explains how finding the ultimate recruiter means not waiting to be found, but actively seeking recruiters out while also making oneself easier to find.  

Rochester, NY — May 5, 2015 — Stephen Van Vreede, CEO of ITtechExec, published a new article titled “How to Stop Wasting Your Time and Find the Ultimate Recruiter.” In the article, he reveals how to discover the best recruiters in the IT and tech fields, suggesting that career seekers also do their part in becoming discoverable and memorable via smart communication tactics and a good attitude.

Van Vreede says, “Can we let you in on a little secret? To find amazing recruiters, you have to do more than seek them out — you have to help them find you. A recruiter is your advocate on the job hunt; a professional who will listen to you, challenge you, give you useful feedback, and help make seemingly impossible connections possible. Finding the ultimate recruiter can make all the difference in your job search.”

Stephen Van Vreede is a personal brand strategist, certified resume writer, job search agent, and the CEO and owner of ITtechExec. Stephen has 10 years of experience in employment strategy and 8 years of corporate management experience. He holds an M.B.A. in Marketing from Villanova University.

Read the entire article here. http://www.ittechexec.com/kick-in-the-pants-how-to-stop-wasting-your-time-and-find-the-ultimate-recruiter/

About ITtechExec:

ITtechExec is a new kind of full-service employment agency that combines resume writing, portfolio building, and job search solutions to launch extraordinary tech careers in the 21st century job market. CEO and Executive Solutions Guide Stephen Van Vreede created ITtechExec in 2001, using his background of personal branding and corporate management to create a multi-pronged approach that gets results. ITtechExec serves as the job seeker and career changer’s trusted adviser, helping them make the best of the careers they’ve built and guiding them into the professional futures they desire.

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Kick in the Pants: How to Stop Wasting Your Time and Find the Ultimate Recruiter

Kick in the Pants: How to Stop Wasting Your Time and Find the Ultimate Recruiter

In today’s job market, there’s perhaps no worse feeling than sending out an unsolicited application to an opening you read about online, knowing that you’ll likely never even get a response. We’ve all been there, trolling the job boards, checking companies’ websites, and poking around LinkedIn for the next great opportunity. When the facts show that most people who send resumes out online don’t get the job — or even an interview — why do so many of us waste our time with it?

The people who get the really good jobs aren’t any different than you; they simply know that it’s people who make it possible, not your resume alone. Of course, some people get lucky and find great work through online application systems. It can happen. But your time is better spent focusing on two additional tactics: using your network and finding a great recruiter.

Today we’re going to focus on finding you the ultimate tech recruiter. It’s not hard, but it’s also not what you might expect. Can we let you in on a little secret? To find amazing recruiters, you have to do more than seek them out — you have to help them find you.

A recruiter is your advocate on the job hunt; a professional who will listen to you, challenge you, give you useful feedback, and help make seemingly impossible connections possible. Finding the ultimate recruiter can make all the difference in your job search.

How To Find The Best Recruiter For You

Use your network. Ask respected colleagues about their experiences with recruiters, and get the contact info for those who actually found your associate a job.

Do your homework online. LinkedIn is a treasure trove of talented recruiters with a seemingly infinite variety of focus areas. Make connections online with those who look promising.

Get tips from companies you admire. Call up the companies where you would love to work and ask them if they use a particular recruiter or staffing agency — make sure to get the contact information.

Stay informed.

If you’re keeping up-to-date on industry news (and you are, right?), you’ll likely see the names of recruiters show up now and again, especially in press releases when companies make a new hire.

Look on message boards in your tech specialty.

Find the message board in your precise field and see if anybody has already recommended a recruiter. If not, start up a new thread.

How to Help Recruiters Find You

One of the best parts about recruiters is that often, they will seek you out for great opportunities — that is, if they can find you.

Keep all communication short, specific, and to-the-point.

Make sure to include keywords so your messages don’t get lost in overstuffed inboxes.

Tell a story with your resume.

With an easy-to-understand resume, your recruiter will better remember your skills and have an easier time telling companies about you.

Avoid generic cover letters.

Recruiters are a busy bunch, so be specific and concise in your cover letter so they know exactly how they can help you.

Build a relationship.

Like any relationship, a successful pairing involves trust, honesty, communication and respect — treat your recruiter with dignity, and he or she will return the favor.

Be ready to hit the ground running.

The work of recruiters is to fill job openings, often quickly. The more you emphasize your preparedness, the better you’ll stand out as a candidate your recruiter will suggest for the next big opportunity.

Use directories to save you hours of research looking for the right recruiter.

At ITtechExec, one of our main goals is to make the job search process more convenient and simple for our client members. And because we really believe that being matched with the right technical recruiters for you is essential to any career move, we offer several different directories at low cost:

Our Directory of 1350+ U.S. Technical Recruiters

Our Directory of 800+ U.S.-based IT Project/Program Management Recruiters

Our Directory of U.S. CIO Recruiters

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says To Thrive During a Merger or Acquisition, Be Prepared

IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says To Thrive During a Merger or Acquisition, Be Prepared

CEO of ITtechExec Stephen Van Vreede advises tech and IT employees to prepare in advance for mergers and acquisitions by staying up-to-date and having a financial plan.

Rochester, NY — March 23, 2015 — Stephen Van Vreede, CEO of ITtechExec, published a new article titled “What To Do If Your Company Gets Acquired.” In the article, he explains that mergers and acquisitions are a reality for IT and tech employees, and that preparing in advance for a transition puts employees in a better position to keep their job or quickly find a new one.

Van Vreede says, “There’s nothing employees want to hear less than that their company is about to go through a merger or an acquisition. But in the tech sector especially, the shifting tides of the marketplace mean that these changes are a reality many people must face. While it’s tempting to bury your head in the sand until the rocky times are over, that’s simply not an option. You want to swim — not sink — no matter what happens to your current job, and the key is to take action now and get prepared.”

Stephen Van Vreede is a personal brand strategist, certified resume writer, job search agent, and the CEO and owner of ITtechExec. Stephen has 10 years of experience in employment strategy and 8 years of corporate management experience. He holds an M.B.A. in Marketing from Villanova University.

Read the entire article here. http://www.ittechexec.com/kick-in-the-pants-what-to-do-if-your-company-gets-acquired/

About ITtechExec:

ITtechExec is a new kind of full-service employment agency that combines resume writing, portfolio building, and job search solutions to launch extraordinary tech careers in the 21st century job market. CEO and Executive Solutions Guide Stephen Van Vreede created ITtechExec in 2001, using his background of personal branding and corporate management to create a multi-pronged approach that gets results. ITtechExec serves as the job seeker and career changer’s trusted adviser, helping them make the best of the careers they’ve built and guiding them into the professional futures they desire.

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When You and Your Technical Recruiter Aren’t a Good Match

When You and Your Technical Recruiter Aren’t a Good Match

Choosing – or finding – the right technical recruiter for you can be vitally important in your IT job search

IT recruitingWhether you love technical recruiters or avoid them like the plague, the fact is they do play a part in the IT hiring process. In fact, in today’s tech job market, they play an even bigger role than they ever have.
That doesn’t mean you have to use them, of course, but why not give yourself as many options as you can?
Where most candidates go wrong with technical recruiters is 1) they don’t properly matched or aligned with them, 2) they expect too much from them, and 3) they fail to nurture an ongoing relationship with the ones who are a good fit to create a potential pipeline of opportunity down the road.
I’ve witnessed many candidates waste a lot of time talking to the wrong technical recruiter for them, and then they can’t figure out what went wrong. 

Sue Sacco, our Concierge Job Search Agent, says that it all starts with a little research. When she is working our client members, she:

  • Prepares a list of properly matched technical recruiters with their contact info to save our members the time and energy of trying to find them on their own. With geographical restrictions no longer at play and the number of technical recruiters skyrocketing, it’s harder than it used to be to find ones that place for the types of positions you want to go for. That is precious IT job search time you have to spend. So Sue takes care of that so our members can focus on other aspects of their search, like networking with colleagues and decision makers (because you should never rely on just one type of job search method in today’s IT/tech marketplace)!
  • Then once Sue creates her list, she either guides the member in how to introduce themselves to these technical recruiters or she takes it a step further and makes the introductions on our members’ behalf, again saving a lot of legwork and freeing up time to pursue other options as well!

Furthermore, once our members do engage with a tech recruiter, Sue can then walk them through their discussions to make sure they stay on track and not waste time here either.

 This is what a concierge job search agent service does. It’s not that you can’t. It’s that you don’t have to.
Either way, though, whether you attempt to find and engage technical recruiters and headhunters on your own or you work with someone like Sue, first and foremost is ask yourself, “Is this technical recruiter a good match?”
If the recruiter can’t say that he or she has placed candidates with your background and your salary range, then don’t waste anymore of your precious job search time.
(Want just a general directory of tech recruiters? Download our directory of 1350+ technical recruiters or our directory of 800+ project/program manager recruiters.)