Category: Resumes

The One-Two Punch Every Job Search of Today Needs

The One-Two Punch Every Job Search of Today Needs

When I first started in the resume and career document design business, times were good, especially in the tech/IT job market. Online tools, such as job boards, seemed like a long awaited answer to speeding up and making the hiring process more efficient, jobs were plentiful, and even though we now had online tools, the job search process itself had not changed all that much.

Then came 2007 and things began to change.

The recession hit in the U.S., upward mobility in IT/tech jobs stagnated, social media began to insert itself into hiring practices, and companies began demanding more and more automation in the hiring process. For a few years, it was hard to tell which direction things were going to go, as well as what was good and what was bad. All we really knew was things were changing, and the job market was less and less pleasant.

But by the early 2010s, it became apparent that the job search landscape was altered for good.

The online tools that were supposed to make life better for companies and job seekers alike persisted, but it was apparent no one gave much credence to them actually working, especially past the manager level. And those newly automated hiring practices became so wieldy that, frankly, only HR people seemed to like them.

What became obvious to us at ITtechExec was that we needed to do more than just design documents; we needed to help guide professionals through this new job search “zoo” by offering solutions that would help them build momentum using other, more effective methods to create opportunities for themselves.

For the past 8 years, we have been offering our very own “concierge” Job Search support solutions. Our clients would start with the career document design with Stephen Van Vreede, Executive Resume Writer, and then move into our job search strategy development and support solutions with Sue Sacco, our Job Search Agent.

Due to the demand for both types of solutions, we now offer them as part of a comprehensive, month-by-month Document Design and Job Search Membership that walks side by side with you throughout your job search introducing you to recruiters identified just for you, working within our own ITtechExec network to help you build contacts in your industry and target market, and offering support in reaching out across your own network more effectively. We aren’t a replacement for your own search efforts, but we do ease the burden and offer you potential connections that could lead to opportunities in today’s market.

In other words, we provide the “one-two punch” that is often missing in today’s job search approach.

Too many professionals find themselves blindsided by this marketplace when they embark on a job search. They’re still remembering the 1990s or early 2000s, and it is hard for them to orient themselves in today’s market. And although things were a bit simpler back then, it’s not all bad today.

You just have to know how to maneuver through it while having some patience.

To find out how it can work for you, book a free 30-minute “Upcoming Career Move Prep” phone or Skype session with me, your IT/Tech Job Search Strategist & Resume Writer, Stephen Van Vreede.

 

Resume and Job Search Strategy for an Aerospace Engineer Program Executive

Resume and Job Search Strategy for an Aerospace Engineer Program Executive

Every candidate faces some unique challenges, which is why it is so important to work with an executive resume writer and job search coach who have a deep understanding of the industry and the market. Let’s take a look at one client we worked with recently who had a unique challenge of her own. Suzanne is a senior executive in the aerospace industry, with quite a successful track record leading large-scale programs with the U.S. and foreign governments, the DoD, and major commercial accounts.

Suzanne’s Challenge

Suzanne’s problem was that she’d worked for several of the large players in the space, all within the past five years with each ending after a short period for various reasons. In addition, she wasn’t able to relocate to any of the major aerospace hubs, at least for another few years. Being bound by non-compete clauses and having a limited selection of opportunities within her geographic market made the pickings very sparse. Suzanne knew that she needed a new strategy.

Positioning Strategy

When we started working on the project to develop her positioning statements and marketing materials (Resume, LinkedIn Profile, Executive Bio, and PSR), my goal was to identify the attributes that would make her truly stand out in the market.

Her old resume was very focused on one of the big aerospace companies, whom she had worked with for nearly two decades. She had a ton of great material for that role; however, that job was five years in the past with four different jobs and four different companies in between.

This sent a signal to the market that her best work was well behind her. Of course, this wasn’t true at all, but reflected how she was feeling on the inside about the value she brought to the four short-term roles she’d held since then. So the initial challenge for me was to understand what she accomplished in each of these roles and affirm the value that she created. This took away any negative feelings associated with the succession of company changes in recent years.

Current Is King

Once Suzanne valued her achievements, we were able to build out the details for the four recent roles to give them some weight and significance. After all, we operate in a world that takes a “what have you done for me lately” perspective.

With the content we added, I focused Suzanne’s narrative on her experience leading and transforming programs, delivering within expedited time lines, and developing a strong customer relationship pipeline to fuel sales growth.

Job Search Strategy

The biggest area of opportunity for Suzanne was with her approach to the job search. Traditional channels just weren’t working because the recruiters she knew all recruited for past employers. When she responded to postings on job boards, she either wasn’t considered or they told her that she was overqualified for the roles, usually from recruiters or HR reps.

We not only created a strategy, but we helped Suzanne execute on a strategy that would connect her with senior executives in the industry. By interfacing with actual decision makers, she was able to talk through the constraints she was facing and make genuine headway in her search. The result was multiple offers that within the level and salary range she was hoping for while meeting the geographic requirement and offering schedule flexibility to suit her family needs.

About Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. Some people just write résumés; he cares about the whole job search. Servings as a Job Search Recruiting Agent, he provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and innovation leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy. Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreedeTo see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, text “STUCK” to 866-294-1324 to start a dialogue OR click on the calendar below to schedule a free 30-minute résumé assessment:

Executive Resume Strategy for a Technology Software and Innovation Leader

Executive Resume Strategy for a Technology Software and Innovation Leader

second-rightI recently had the opportunity to work with a technology leader – let’s call him Sam — who specializes in solutions architecture design, software development, and innovation, most notably in the areas of real-time Web and mobile solutions as well as business productivity tools. Sam’s company had recently gone through two re-organizations, and he was losing confidence in the direction of the firm, despite being elevated in the company during each restructuring.

Sam’s Challenge

Sam’s problem was that he’d been asked to establish the company’s professional services organization, and he was presenting most of his current information as project-based details. That would be fine if Sam wanted to pursue contract-based or project-based opportunities for his next role, but he craved being part of a larger organization that focused on designing and delivering solutions for internal use.

Thankfully, Sam’s experience included solution design and Web product development at multiple companies over the years, so we were able to successfully present his technical chops in the current role and all his previous roles.

Can You Have Too Much Leadership Experience?

The other factor complicating Sam’s profile was the executive leadership flavor that his current role entailed. Although he didn’t want to be an individual contributor, his passion was to be able to lead a team of engineers, architects, and innovators while being hands-on throughout the entire solution development lifecycle.

His old resume was portraying him as a hands-off business leader who oversaw a consulting group that happened to work in the technology/software realm. This was not getting him the type of calls from companies and recruiters that he was hoping for.

What’s the Solution?

Sam and I had some pretty in-depth conversations about the solutions he and his team actively designed, developed, and delivered. I have to say, some of them were pretty remarkable. I wasn’t the only one that thought so, as they have been implemented at some of the world’s leading tech product firms, insurance companies, and financial institutions, generating some very positive outcomes.

I was able to create a new resume that focused his story on solution design and development as well as on the business problems those solutions helped to address. This totally changed Sam’s narrative, gave him a lot more confidence when speaking with recruiters, and improved the perception that potential suitors had of what he offered to them.

The opportunities that Sam has entertained since our work together are all completely aligned with his passion for being that hands-on innovator and thought leader in the tech space.

So if you find yourself out in the wilderness, wondering where to even begin with your next career move, text “STUCK” to 866-294-1324 to start a dialogue OR click on the calendar below to schedule a free consult.

Stephen Van Vreede

About Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical resume writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and innovation leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy. Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreedeTo see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, text “STUCK” to 866-294-1324 to start a dialogue OR click on the calendar below to schedule a free consult:

Why CTOs Need a Resume Portfolio to Showcase Innovation

CTO Needs a Portfolio Infographic

Competitive Market

The funnel narrows considerably for jobs in the C-Suite today. In fact, when you’re talking about a Chief Technology Officer (CTO) role, they are even more difficult to come across than their counterparts in IT (CIO), Finance (CFO), Operations (COO), Marketing (CMO), and Strategy (CSO). This means that a lot of excellent candidates with backgrounds in product development, solution architecture, engineering, and digital transformation will be in contention for these coveted few opportunities.

Differentiation is Needed

Making yourself stand out from the crowd is a must, but most candidates simply do what everyone else does: update the resume with some bland statements and trite descriptions, then copy it over into their LinkedIn Profile.

Sorry, but that just won’t cut it. If you want recruiters and decision makers to perceive you as innovative — you know, the type of person that they want to take over the chief innovator role for their company — than you have to show yourself to be, in fact, different and distinct, with a vision that is hyper-dimensional (sorry…HR types might say “out-of-the-box thinker” here).

Be Taken Seriously as a CTO Candidate

Do you want to be taken seriously? Then show it!

Present yourself in a unique way. Showcase the creativity that you helped to foster in an organization. Highlight the solution path you and your teams took to take a few novel products from conception through to new product introduction (NPI). Do it in a way that gets them thinking about the possibilities of you leading their organization to become an innovation engine.

Resume Portfolio Documents

The great part is, there’s no established standard or “rules” for how to present your record of innovation beyond the resume and LinkedIn Profile. However, I strongly encourage that the presentation be separate from the traditional resume. For example, you can create a detailed innovation timeline, a one-page visual (like an infographic), or an extensive write up on some high-profile innovations that you helped to deliver.

Writing and Creating Visuals Isn’t Your Strength?

No worries…we’ve got you covered. That’s a specialty of ours. I am passionate about connecting with innovators and helping them to position themselves effectively for these roles in the market.

  • To schedule a free consult call with me, click on the link for my online calendar.
  • Check out the video on this post on YouTube.

Stephen Van Vreede

 

About Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and innovation leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

Should You Have a Video Resume?

Should You Have a Video Resume?

video resumeSending traditional resumes into the void can feel like you’re throwing away your time and energy over and over again. In a competitive IT and tech job market, candidates who don’t cut it often won’t even receive a polite rejection letter. (The nerve!) One work-around to the drudgery of resume submissions is creating an impressive, highly individualized video resume. But how do you know if a video IT resume (or other technical resume) is going to get you the job—or turn you into a laughing stock?

You should only create a video resume if it fits the culture of the company and position where you’re applying.

1. Know your audience. Tailor everything about your video—from how you’re dressed to the words you use to your tone of voice—to the precise company you’re applying to. Don’t use the same generic video to apply to multiple jobs!

2. Keep it to the minimum length. It takes less than 30 seconds to scan a resume—60 if it catches the reader’s eye. Your video should be no longer than one minute, so highlight only what’s vital for viewers to know.

3. Act natural. This means no reading from scripts and no reciting your resume—no cue cards, even! Be yourself, and don’t be afraid to do as many takes as necessary until you get it right.

4. Show why you’re using the video format. You’re using the video format because you want to show off things that can’t be contained on a regular resume. Make it clear you have a good reason for others to watch you instead of looking over your written resume.

5. Make it stunning. There’s no question that you should strive to make your video as high quality as possible. Don’t send a video that is anything less than perfect!

Think long and hard about where you’ll be sending your video, because once you click “send,” you lose control of that content forever.

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

Don’t Make These Cover Letter Faux Pas

Don’t Make These Cover Letter Faux Pas

cover letterA killer resume might be able to get you the job, but you’ll never have the chance if your cover letter is a dud.

In the world of hiring, there’s a lot of attention paid to writing the perfect resume. Especially for those of us who are better at coding than writing, getting the resume help we need can be a crucial step on our career path. But for every perfect resume in the world, there seems to be at least double the amount of lackluster cover letters. That’s because people don’t understand that a resume isn’t just a resume — the cover letter is part of the package, too.

This is to say: your cover letter should never be an afterthought.

Whether the job you’re applying to has a casual or formal company culture, you need a cover letter that’s somewhere in between the two. Too casual, and you’ll look sloppy; too formal, and you won’t be memorable. Your cover letter needs to strike the right balance between friendly, professional, and engaging to get the hiring manager to actually look at your amazing, perfectly polished resume.

If you’re starting to realize just how many pitfalls there are in writing a great cover letter, you’re on the right track. Doing it well takes time and attention to detail.  Fortunately, some job candidates make the same types of cover letter faux pas over and over again, which means you can learn from their mistakes.

Here are our top 5 cover letter faux pas. Steer clear of these mistakes, and you’ll do your resume justice:

  1. Generic Opening Lines

To Whom It May Concern. I Am Writing To Express My Interest. My Name Is. If you’re currently using any of these in your cover letter, time to break out the eraser and start again. Hiring managers get dozens, even hundreds of cover letters, which means starting off on a bland foot probably won’t get you to the next step. Your opening line doesn’t have to be the written equivalent of fireworks, but it should make the reader want to keep on reading — not stop him dead in his tracks.

  1. Lack of Editing

Spelling and grammar mistakes happen — but not in cover letters or resumes. Any error in your cover letter gives the hiring manager one less reason to keep considering your application. Don’t give him the satisfaction! Proofread like crazy, and have a friend or professional give it a read, too.

  1. Using the Wrong Words

Relying too heavily on jargon, idioms, or slang can make your cover letter appear unprofessional. While some industry speak may be necessary depending on your situation, remember that the person reading your cover letter might very well work in HR, not the department you’re applying to.

  1. Not Using the Right Words

Many companies use software to weed out candidates and reduce the applicant pool. How do they do this? Keywords. This means that it’s absolutely necessary to use the exact terminology that describes what it is you do and what you have to offer. Tip: Look to the job listing for ideas.

  1. Too Much Complexity

Florid language or complicated fonts only make the hiring manager’s job harder. After you complete the first draft of your cover letter, go back through and see how you can make it simpler. Remember, simplicity translates into effectivity, which is exactly what you want. Keep it short, sweet, and simple, and you’ll dramatically improve your chances of showing off that dazzling resume of yours!

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

 

The Real Skinny: How Wearable Tech Might Influence Your Next Job

The Real Skinny: How Wearable Tech Might Influence Your Next Job

wearable techThe internet can’t stop talking about wearable tech, and why should they? With many thought leaders suggesting it could be “the new smartphone,” businesses are clamoring to get an edge on the market. But with businesses and consumers raving about this new technology, where does that leave employees who are working in related fields, and what does it mean for their jobs?

One of major impacts of wearable technology is that it’s forcing professionals in the field to think creatively. We’ve already written about why tech employees need to use their creative sides, but it bears repeating. Wearable tech is a highly creative new sector that combines artistry with practicality. As the IT and tech industries expand over the coming years, how are you going to push the limits on what’s possible and discover creative, unexpected solutions?

Another predicted result of wearable tech is that employees will become even more productive. Experts estimate that this new technology will make people up to 8.5 times more productive, in fact, which will have huge ramifications on jobs and profits. If the average user is that much more productive armed with wearable technology, how much more productive can you, the tech expert, be in your workplace?

Lastly, you can expect to see even more blurred lines between work and life once wearable technology goes widespread. If today, we use our smartphones to manage our lives and families from our desks, think of how much more we’ll be able to do — and how much more efficiently — when we are armed with smartwatches, smartglasses, and smartclothing.

We hope to see wearable tech make a big different in terms of work-life balance, allowing us easier access to work or to life when we need it the most.

How do you expect wearable tech to affect your work?

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

 

 

IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says Strive For Workplace Equality Systemically And Personally

IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says Strive For Workplace Equality Systemically And Personally

CEO of ITtechExec Stephen Van Vreede discusses gender equality in tech workplaces, explaining that changes must happen at both individual and structural levels.

Rochester, NY — May 27, 2015 — Stephen Van Vreede, CEO of ITtechExec, published a new blog post titled “Women in Tech: Top 5 Career-Building Tips.” In the post, he shares with readers five ways they can build better careers in tech and IT as the world of work determines — though not quickly enough — how to hire, promote, and compensate women equally.

Van Vreede says, “There are few more important questions in tech right now than how to correct the gender imbalance in the workplace … While ideally all women in tech would be afforded equal opportunity, advancement, and compensation by their employers, that’s not everyone’s reality quite yet. This is why we’ve assembled our top five tips for women already in tech or just starting to build their careers.”

Stephen Van Vreede is a personal brand strategist, certified resume writer, job search agent, and the CEO and owner of ITtechExec. Stephen has 10 years of experience in employment strategy and 8 years of corporate management experience. He holds an M.B.A. in Marketing from Villanova University.

Read the entire article here. http://www.ittechexec.com/kick-in-the-pants-women-in-tech-top-5-career-building-tips/

About ITtechExec:

ITtechExec is a new kind of full-service employment agency that combines resume writing, portfolio building, and job search solutions to launch extraordinary tech careers in the 21st century job market. CEO and Executive Solutions Guide Stephen Van Vreede created ITtechExec in 2001, using his background of personal branding and corporate management to create a multi-pronged approach that gets results. ITtechExec serves as the job seeker and career changer’s trusted adviser, helping them make the best of the careers they’ve built and guiding them into the professional futures they desire.

 

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IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says Embrace Video Interviews To Ace Video Interviews

IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says Embrace Video Interviews To Ace Video Interviews

CEO of ITtechExec Stephen Van Vreede explains how tech and IT job candidates can make the most of video interviews by being fully prepared for their particular set of benefits and challenges.

Rochester, NY — May 19, 2015 — Stephen Van Vreede, CEO of ITtechExec, published a new article titled “How to Ace a Video Interview.” In the article, he tells job candidates that in video interviews, how they act is equally, if not more, important than what they say, which means even old pros need to reassess their interviewing skills and update them for this new format.

Van Vreede says, “So you got the interview. Congratulations. But you don’t have the job yet. If the only thing that’s between you and your dream job is a video interview, it’s crucial for you to be extra prepared. Video interviews pose a whole new set of challenges for job candidates — and they aren’t all what you’d expect.”

Stephen Van Vreede is a personal brand strategist, certified resume writer, job search agent, and the CEO and owner of ITtechExec. Stephen has 10 years of experience in employment strategy and 8 years of corporate management experience. He holds an M.B.A. in Marketing from Villanova University.

Read the entire article here. http://www.ittechexec.com/kick-in-the-pants-how-to-ace-a-video-interview/

About ITtechExec:

ITtechExec is a new kind of full-service employment agency that combines resume writing, portfolio building, and job search solutions to launch extraordinary tech careers in the 21st century job market. CEO and Executive Solutions Guide Stephen Van Vreede created ITtechExec in 2001, using his background of personal branding and corporate management to create a multi-pronged approach that gets results. ITtechExec serves as the job seeker and career changer’s trusted adviser, helping them make the best of the careers they’ve built and guiding them into the professional futures they desire.

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Kick in the Pants: How to Ace a Video Interview

Kick in the Pants: How to Ace a Video Interview

job interview

Kick in the Pants: How to Ace a Video Interview

So you got the interview. Congratulations. But you don’t have the job yet. If the only thing that’s between you and your dream job is a video interview, it’s crucial for you to be extra prepared. Video interviews pose a whole new set of challenges for job candidates — and they aren’t all what you’d expect.

Video conference company PGi’s infographic on video interviews sheds light on some staggering statistics. Aside from reporting what we already knew — that video interviews are on the rise — they also reveal that the way we communicate over video differs greatly from the way we communicate in person. If you’re a Skype or Google Hangouts user, you already know that between technology glitches, faulty microphones, and time delays, getting our message across over video can be a big challenge. The infographic confirms what you may have already expected:

Your facial expression and tone of voice matter far more than the actual words you say.

True, it’s shocking to think that hires are made based upon factors that many of us don’t consciously control. But we see a silver lining in these statistics: First, video interviews have the ability to cut through some of the typical nervousness caused by in-person interviews because you are in the comfort of your own home. And second, when you put verbal communication on the back burner, it frees you up to find your “personality match” at a job — a factor that can play a big role in how happy you will be at the company.

When you look at it this way, it’s easy to see many reasons to embrace the format of the video interview.

Still, a video interview requires just as much preparation as an in-person interview, only the typical interview prep advice needs a little update. The following are some tips that can help you put your best foot forward, even when you’re not asked to step outside your home:

Do your part to make the interview go smoothly.

The same courtesies that apply to an in-person interview also apply to a video interview. This means you must show up on time and not let technical difficulties stop you. It’s imperative to test your equipment beforehand. Make sure your computer is charged, your microphone works, and that you have a steady internet connection in a quiet, calm space. Also, know how your equipment works. If you will be asked to screenshare as part of the interview, be 100% sure you aren’t sharing too much.

How you look and act matter more than ever.

Your interviewers may only see you from the waist up, but that half is crucial. Video interviews are the right time to break out your inner film director and plan out your wardrobe, angles, and lighting. It doesn’t make you vain — these are precautions that allow your interviewers to see you clearly and not get distracted. Set yourself up in front of a solid background with the camera at eye level, and make sure you aren’t backlit. Look at the camera, not the screen, so you make digital “eye contact” with your interviewers. And remember to speak a little more slowly and clearly than you need to in person.

Be ultra-prepared.

Have you sent over all important documents ahead of time? Do you know each of your interviewers’ names? Have you planned out answers to potential questions? The better prepared you are, the smoother the video interview process will go, and the better “digital” impression you’ll make.

Remember, you’re working with a different set of challenges in a video interview, but it’s also a different set of benefits. Work to create a frictionless interview experience where you can showcase how bright, friendly, and interested you are, and you’ll be well ahead of the curve.

Take a crash course.

Believe it or not, but you can get help. Just like you would take a course on almost anything, you can take mock interview courses to improve your skills here. Yes, it takes eating some humble pie, but it’s wise to find out where your strengths and weaknesses lie. Click here to learn more about our Video Interviewing Crash Course.

 

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!