Category: Work Issues

The Sustainable Career

The Sustainable Career

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Some people wonder why it seems like others are always catching breaks at work…getting a promotion or being recruited for an exciting new opportunity. For those who excel, it usually has to do with a single decision made, committed to, and executed over the course of their career.

The Decision

What’s that decision? Simply put, it is the decision to invest in their future, to bring a passion to their place of work every day, to understand their value, and to know how their contributions impact the business at large.

“C’mon, you can’t be serious!” I know, you see evidence all around you of those who are getting ahead without giving one moment’s thought to these things. You’re right, but I would contend that these people aren’t becoming true leaders or giants in the industry. Instead, they’re just focused on nudging their way to the head of the peloton (in cycling, that’s the main pack of riders that cluster usually well behind the leaders). If you would characterize those you’re thinking about as image-conscious and, as my 11-year-old daughter likes to say, “one-uppers” then you’re spot on.

Is That What You Want Too?

Honestly, can you say that’s what you aspire to? Don’t you want to be great…not just fake things so everyone thinks you’re great but to actually be great?

If so, begin by making the decision today to invest in yourself and be passionate about what you do. There are so many ways to investment in you soundly. The typical fallback is another degree or certification. Those are fine but they do little in the way of helping you to understand who you are, what you want, what you have to offer, and how an organization should value your current and future potential.

That’s where building your brand image comes in. Not an illusion or false image, but a genuine representation of you in a form (resume, LinkedIn, bio, in-person) that resonates with executives internally and at prospective new companies.

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (Nodd
lePlace
) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

Employee Engagement in the Workplace: A Disaster of Epic Proportions

Employee Engagement in the Workplace: A Disaster of Epic Proportions

realized-1238069The American workforce is largely disengaged from the goals and objectives of the organizations by which they are employed.

The 2015 State of the American Workplace study, conducted by Gallup for the past several years, shows that less than one-third (33%) of employees in the U.S. are considered engaged in their jobs and with the companies they represent.

employee engagement

That’s a staggering statistic! Unfortunately, it’s staggeringly poor. Let’s put that into perspective as we consider the impact this would have on workforce productivity at five of America’s most recognized tech companies. Again, this is just an example of the number of disengaged employees we could have if the national averages held at each of these companies.

Company Name Total Employees Disengaged Employees at 32.1% Engagement Rate
HP 302,000 205,058
Amazon 222,400 151,009
Microsoft 118,500 80,461
Apple 115,000 78,085
Google 59,975 40,723
 

TOTAL

 

817,875

 

555,336

 

What’s the Problem?

Without question, you can remove a certain segment of workers from the population because you’ll never be able to engage them at work. Those individuals will always have the “clock-me-in, leave-me-alone, clock-me-out, and forget-about-it” mentality. However, a larger segment of the population truly desires to bring value and be valued at their company. Well why aren’t they engaged then?

Peel Back the Onion

The answer to this question has multiple layers and many dynamic factors. But when you peel back those layers, the biggest element contributing to lack of employee engagement is leadership. Hold on, though! Before you go pointing your finger at “over-paid” CEOs and business executives, consider just who at the leadership level of companies has the most engagement with employees. Yup…middle management, including front-line supervisors, managers, directors, and department heads.

Two major deficiencies at the middle management layer are the main culprits affecting employee engagement. They are the relational and accountability aspects of management or leadership.

Most managers do not establish the proper foundation for a successful team/employee relationship. Being pals with your team does not lead to employee satisfaction. Neither does being aloof or acting like you’re “above” them. What really drives employee engagement in this area is mutual trust and respect based on professionalism, performance, and the value placed on each team member’s contributions.

Accountability, or the lack thereof, is the other major problem today. This is not to promote dictatorships in the management ranks because accountability cuts both ways. The leader is accountable on both a personal and a professional level to:

  • His or her team,
  • Performance of the team, and
  • Meeting the objectives of the organization.

Can This Help Me In the Job Market?

Executives, and rising middle managers, that are able to instill this type of culture in their organization are highly coveted because so many companies talk about change leadership but have a hard time delivering it. Likewise, those executives continually recruit directors and managers that “get it,” so positioning yourself in the market (we call it “branding”) as an accountable, relationship-building leader will result in the type of opportunities in which you’ll have the opportunity to work with inspired, engaged employees…and will help you be engaged yourself.

Don’t underestimate the power of team and culture leadership in your resume and LinkedIn profile. But be sure to have an effective strategy in place for how you present those skills. Having the right blend of hard-core, high-impact achievements along with those “soft” skills is critical to getting the response you’re looking for from executives and recruiters.

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

Why You Need to Have Good Relationships With Junior Employees

Why You Need to Have Good Relationships With Junior Employees

You’ve made it to the top–congratulations. Your years of hard work, late nights, and sacrifices have paid off, and now you’re at the top of your corporate food chain. But is it us, or does it sometimes feel a little bit like an echo chamber way up on high? You might not miss the busywork and second-rate projects, but you are missing out big time if you don’t foster excellent relationships with the folks who are now where you were ten years ago.

The most successful businesses fully leverage the intelligence and know-how of all of their employees, not just those at the top. But in big corporations, most of the vital decisions are made by only a fraction of the employees. Not only does this deprive your organization of its full resources, but it can lead to unilateral thinking that will keep you stuck in place rather than moving forward. Junior employees have a lot to learn from you, but you also have a lot to learn from them. Although you are the resident expert and have the final say on every business decision you make, your juniors may have valuable input that could surprise you.

If you look at today’s startups, you’ll see that they way senior staff interfaces with newbies is changing. Gone are the hierarchies, processes, and sometimes even office doors that separate one level of employee from the next. In tech, innovation is the name of the game—and what better way to foster innovation than by listening to fresh ideas? You don’t have to work somewhere with a “flat hierarchy” to reap the benefits of interfacing with juniors, since some companies are better suited towards this than others. What do you have to do? Simply start talking!

When you speak face-to-face with a new or lower-level employee, two things happen immediately:

  1. You contribute towards a company culture where people feel comfortable talking to anyone and everyone, allowing for cross-pollination of ideas.
  2. You begin to build a relationship that could benefit you down the road.

It’s needless to say that the more positive relationships you foster at work, the better. You don’t have to become somebody’s formal mentor to make a difference in his or her life. Sharing your expertise and listening to the struggles and experiences of your juniors will make both of you better at your jobs. Plus, the person who is your junior today could end up being part of your team in just a few years. The better working relationship you develop now, the easier it will be to continue working together down the road.

How can you start to reach out to new or junior employees?

Start a club. Whether it’s learning a new coding language or simply a book club, a regular organization that all staff is invited to become part of is a smart, practical way to socialize and exchange ideas.

Put in face time. Nobody needs more email–instead, try walking over to your junior employee and discussing the matter at hand in person.

Encourage family events. Try holding monthly family potlucks or a “family day” at the office to make your work environment a little more personal, and to get to know your coworkers that much better.

Create a company project. Some companies start gardens, volunteering projects, or even microbreweries to help employees bond. It doesn’t take much–what ongoing project could benefit your company and help improve your company culture?

Don’t go straight home after work. It’s tempting to head straight for your car after work, but that immediately erases any possibility of socializing after-hours with your colleagues. A good, old-fashioned drink or coffee after work is a classic, foolproof way to get to know coworker better.

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

 

Not Quite Qualified For The Job You Want? Here’s What To Do

Not Quite Qualified For The Job You Want? Here’s What To Do

Is there anything more disappointing than scrolling all the way to the bottom of your dream job listing only to discover that—horror of horrors—you’re technically unqualified? Finding opportunities that make your pulse race and your pupils dilate is a rarity, which is why it feels so wrong to let them pass you by, especially if you’re only slightly lacking in skills or experience. Some job seekers might be tempted to shrug it off and move on—but smart job seekers know that any job is worth applying to, as along as you have a game plan.

Skills vs. Experience vs. Qualifications

Before you start brainstorming your strategy, you need to examine the job description carefully and determine whether you lack skills, experience, qualifications, or a little of each. Needless to say, the more you lack, the harder it will be to sell yourself to the hiring manager. But it’s not impossible!

Skills—like speaking a foreign language or being an expert-level user of certain softwareare perhaps the easiest item to make up for because you can start learning now. Being a beginner is better than having no knowledge whatsoever, and it shows your commitment to the role.

Experience always means time, and often time spent doing a certain set of activities. You can’t make up for lost time, but you can find equivalents in your own history that parallel the experience your future employer is looking for.

Qualifications, most often degrees or certifications, aren’t easy to make up for, either. But if you have experience doing similar work to those who possess the qualification in question, it can be a breeze to prove to employers that you’re the right person for the job.

Now that you’ve parsed out exactly where your resume is missing a few pieces, it’s time to act.

Start by writing the best cover letter of your life.

Consult a professional if necessary—you’ve only got one shot. This cover letter needs not only to capture the hiring manager’s attention, but also to make it crystal-clear that you’re the best person for the job with your exact skill set, even though it varies slightly from the one they are seeking.

Be frank and transparent about your background.

Overselling yourself is the worst thing you could do right now, so don’t just tell the employer what they want to hear. Be honest—and that includes being honest about how amazing you’ll be for the company once they hire you.

Express how your background is equivalent to what they’re seeking.

If you’re confident that you can do a bang-up job, practice explaining how and why. Remember that employers must weed through hundreds, even thousands of candidates, and the job description is their number one way to do it. How are you more qualified than the rest?

Tune into the company’s pain points.

Hiring is all about solving problems—if there weren’t a problem to solve, there’d be no need to hire you. The most reassuring thing your potential employer could hear is that you understand not only what their pain points are, but also that you know exactly how to fix them with the precise skills and experience that you bring to the table.

Use your network.

Sometimes it’s just not possible to make contact with the hiring manager by throwing your name into the candidate pool. Tools like Applicant Tracking Systems may weed you out before your resume ever sees human eyes. This is when it’s vital to call upon your network in order to make a connection. Start by asking for an informational interview and finding out why they are looking for a candidate with skills and experience that are different from yours. Only then will you be in a good position to apply (or reapply) to the job—and you’ll have a contact on the inside.

Remember, not all companies are looking for a candidate that matches 100 percent of the bullet points in the job description. If it’s your dream job, it’s worth the extra effort. Have a plan, be forthright, and go for it—you’ll never get the job if you don’t ask for it.

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

Can a Daily “Power Hour” Make You Happier & More Productive?

Can a Daily “Power Hour” Make You Happier & More Productive?

Okay, be honest: do you have a productivity problem?

For most employees, productivity comes in fits and starts that spread out over the course of the workday. It’s impossible, after all, to be working to your maximum potential 100 percent of the time. And, some job functions simply require more focus and brainpower than others. Because of this, it’s all too easy to put off the “real” work for another day and chip away at tasks that are relatively easy to do, but only moderately important.

The result is that you might feel like you’re working to your maximum potential, but you’re not actually getting anything done, which can be awfully stressful. This is where “Power Hour” can save your sanity—and your job.

Bestselling author and productivity expert Gretchen Rubin writes about Power Hour in her new book, Better Than Before, and we think it’s a genius concept. Ready for it?

  • Set the timer for 60 minutes
  • Complete as many of your challenging, high-priority tasks as possible
  • Stop as soon as you hear the buzzer

Deceptively simple, Power Hour is a productivity trick that can actually help employees get more done in far less time. Think about it. If you are highly productive—and we mean highly—for 5 hours out of the week, every week, you can accomplish practically anything. We’re talking no distractions, nose to the grindstone, old-fashioned hard work here. Does this mean you stop working the rest of the week? Of course not. It means that you get what’s important done on time, every time—but in reasonable chunks that never feel overwhelming.

You can adapt the idea in any number of ways, increasing the time frame or spacing them out to work for your job and schedule. How will you use the concept of Power Hour to get more done at work with less overall stress?

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

Should You Talk Openly About Your Income?

Should You Talk Openly About Your Income?

salaryWhat would you do if you found out your colleagues were making significantly more than you for the exact same work?

Think back to all of those times you stayed late at the office. The skipped lunch breaks. Missed social opportunities. And especially all of those brilliant ideas of yours that helped your organization save money and work more efficiently. As a top-notch employee, you’d expect to be earning as much—or even a little more—than your peers.

Reality check: You might not be. But you’d never know it unless you talked about it.

There’s nothing like discussing salary to summon up corporate smoke and mirrors that deflect the conversation, or even prevent it from happening in the first place. It’s understandable—money is personal, and even emotional. Thinking of your value as a worker in terms of dollars and cents can feel dehumanizing and uncomfortable. Add to that the old-fashioned idea that discussing money just isn’t polite, and you’ve got radio silence when it comes to how much money you and your co-workers make.

Even worse, companies benefit hugely from propagating the myth that it’s illegal to discuss salaries. Whether it’s written into the contract that you sign upon hiring or gently discouraged by your HR manager, many corporations don’t want you discussing how much you make with fellow employees. After all, if you find out that they’re making more than you, you might ask them for more money.

Sound fishy to you? It is.

In a large majority of cases, it is absolutely legal to discuss your salary with your coworkers. You don’t need to be part of a union, and you don’t need to be a government employee. Though certain workers are exempt from this law (such as supervisors and independent contractors), roles are sometimes miscategorized and actually do receive legal protection for salary discussion.

Since 1935, the National Labor Relations Act has protected the right of employees to engage in discussions for mutual aid or protection—and that includes talking about salaries. The problem? Many consider the act to be weak in terms of holding companies accountable for violations. This is one reason President Obama has been working to strengthen workplace transparency and accountability, having recently signed two executive orders to do just that.

For tech and IT workers where salaries can have a very wide range, it’s crucial not to get stuck at a lower salary range than what you deserve. And for women and minorities in tech, the wage gap can spell out an average of 25 percent less earnings than non-minorities. We think that everybody deserves to be paid fairly for what they do. Don’t you?

So what can you do if you think you’re earning less than you should be?

Find out if you’re protected under the National Labor Relations Act.

Don’t assume that you aren’t! Try contacting the National Labor Relations Board if you’re unsure.

Learn the power of negotiation.

One of the major reasons for pay gaps is that some people are simply better negotiators than others. Leverage the power of a convincing argument to show what you’re worth and get a better offer.

Ask for a raise.

Are your co-workers asking for more money, but not you? Don’t hold your breath until your boss decides to give you more money. Ask for it, and you might just get it.

Don’t suffer in silence.

If you have the legal protection to do so, go ahead and talk openly about how much you’re earning and why you think it should change. It could make a major difference in your career advancement—and your bank account.

Report violations to the NLRB.

How much you earn should depend on your qualifications, not your gender, age, race, negotiating skills, or how much the boss likes you. Work against inequality and the illegal silencing of salary discussions by contacting the NLRB if necessary. You’ll not only help your own salary, but you’ll promote a more just and fair treatment for all qualified employees.

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

5 Signs You’ve Outgrown Your Job

5 Signs You’ve Outgrown Your Job

toon944Having a job that’s easy, high-paying, and totally free from stress sounds too good to be true—but it can also be a sign that you’ve outgrown your job.

For IT and tech workers, the sky is truly the limit to just how far your career can go. People in the industry have active, creative minds that want to be put to great use, solving complex problems and making the world a better place. Nobody wants to waste your brilliant mind in a role that doesn’t demand the best of you. That’s why it’s vital to watch out for the signs of outgrowing your job—and remember, it can sneak up on you faster than you realize.

1 You aren’t challenged anymore.

Work that’s too easy gets old, fast. If you’re not being asked to stretch your abilities, you’ll stagnate instead of grow, which can actually hurt you if you want to take on a more challenging role down the road.

2 You’ve perfected your role and workflow.

Have you automated your tasks and condensed your week’s work into a fraction of the hours it’s supposed to take? It’s time to move on and put those hours you’ve saved to good use.

3 You’re doing way more than your job description.

Managers often ask workers to perform at a higher level for a period of time before giving them a promotion. If you’ve essentially been doing another job for more than six months, it’s time you got a new title—and a raise.

4 You’re bored to death.

Life is too short (and too interesting) to spend time bored. Watching the second hand on the clock? It’s time to move onwards and upwards.

5 You know you could do so much more.

Do you feel constrained by what you’re “allowed” to do as part of your job? Do you see ways you could improve things, but you keep hitting roadblocks from your superiors? It’s time to take that ambition and use it to get yourself a shiny new job—one that asks a lot of you and recognizes you for your amazing contributions.

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

The Real Skinny: Why Doing Good—Not Just Good Work—Matters

The Real Skinny: Why Doing Good—Not Just Good Work—Matters

Do you use your tech wizardry for good or evil?

Okay, hopefully you’re not using it for evil. But if you want to put your skills to use, you need to know that tech companies these days are looking for more than a neutral employee who does only what’s asked and goes home at the end of the day. They’re looking for innovative movers and shakers concerned about creating something that’s not just cool or clever, but also creates positive change in the world.

After all, who has more power and resources to do good than IT and tech professionals? Technology is at the root of every scalable force for good that exists in our modern times. Whether it’s as simple as advances in security systems or as complex as 3D-printed prosthetic limbs, tech is making life better for humans and the planet. It’s unstoppable—so leverage that power for your career!

But you don’t need to be a do-gooder to impress companies with your skills. It’s easier than you might think to incorporate positive change into your existing career and skill development. Ask yourself the following questions:

  • Can I make a small change in my work that makes life easier for at least one person?
  • Is there a place I can volunteer to build my skills and help others simultaneously?
  • Are there any junior employees I can mentor and positively influence?
  • Can I take my side project to the next level by incorporating socially or environmentally responsible elements?
  • Are there untapped resources I could donate to make an improvement for my company or clients?

Remember, the core mission of most companies is to make life better for people and the planet. When you show a dedication to this mission—and a white-hot skill set—you’ll make an unforgettable impression at your current and future workplaces.

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says Feeling Overwhelmed At Work Is Not The Same As Being Overworked

IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says Feeling Overwhelmed At Work Is Not The Same As Being Overworked

CEO of ITtechExec Stephen Van Vreede differentiates between overwhelm and overwork, noting that in today’s culture of constant busyness, employees are having a hard time telling one from the other.

Rochester, NY — Jun 23, 2015 — Stephen Van Vreede, CEO of ITtechExec, published a new blog post titled “Overworked or Overwhelmed at Work? How to Tell the Difference.” In the post, he offers fives questions workers can ask themselves if they think they may be overworked but aren’t sure, emphasizing that work-related damage to social, emotional, or physical well-being is a problem that must be addressed sooner rather than later.

Van Vreede says, “How many times have you given up social engagements, weekends, or even a good night’s sleep for the sake of your job? While IT and tech workers love being challenged and pitching in on important projects, there’s a fine line between feeling too busy and actually working too much. In today’s world where ‘busy’ is something people tend to brag about, it’s getting harder and harder to tell what a normal amount of work is. So how can you tell if you’re overworked, or just overwhelmed?”

Stephen Van Vreede is a personal brand strategist, certified resume writer, job search agent, and the CEO and owner of ITtechExec. Stephen has 10 years of experience in employment strategy and 8 years of corporate management experience. He holds an M.B.A. in Marketing from Villanova University.

Read the entire article here. http://www.ittechexec.com/overworked-or-overwhelmed-at-work-how-to-tell-the-difference/

About ITtechExec:

ITtechExec is a new kind of full-service employment agency that combines resume writing, portfolio building, and job search solutions to launch extraordinary tech careers in the 21st century job market. CEO and Executive Solutions Guide Stephen Van Vreede created ITtechExec in 2001, using his background of personal branding and corporate management to create a multi-pronged approach that gets results. ITtechExec serves as the job seeker and career changer’s trusted adviser, helping them make the best of the careers they’ve built and guiding them into the professional futures they desire.

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Overworked or Overwhelmed at Work? How to Tell the Difference

Overworked or Overwhelmed at Work? How to Tell the Difference

mission7How many times have you given up social engagements, weekends, or even a good night’s sleep for the sake of your job? While IT and tech leaders love being challenged and pitching in on important projects, there’s a fine line between feeling too busy and actually working too much. In today’s world where “busy” is something people tend to brag about, it’s getting harder and harder to tell what a normal amount of work is. So how can you tell if you’re overworked, or just overwhelmed?

Do you have a strong support network of family and non-work friends?

Work is important, but it’s not everything. A workload that consistently interferes with maintaining healthy relationships outside of the office is a red flag that you are working too much.

How are your health and sleeping habits?

Overwork and stress wreak havoc on our health and ability to get a good night’s rest — a vicious cycle that is bound for disaster. If you’re busy all of the time but sleeping soundly and feeling great, you’re probably just overwhelmed, not overworked.

Do you look forward — or dread — going into the office?

Well-adjusted workers might not be clamoring to get back to the office Monday morning, but neither do they dread it. Strong feelings of resentment or fear could mean that your workload is unmanageable.

Can you manage to keep your emotions in check?

If you’re having sudden bursts of emotions that seem out of control and out of the ordinary, that may be another sign of overwork and stress. While it’s normal to experience many different emotions on-the-job, working more than we’re physically and emotionally able can make it harder to maintain a professional demeanor.

Are you meeting your own high standards?

Perhaps the most telltale sign of overwork is a notable decline in your quality of work. After all, if you’ve proven you can excel at your job — and we are sure that you have — you should be able to continue to do so.

If you feel certain you are working excessively, talk to somebody about it today before it becomes a problem. Managers and HR departments know that overworked employees are less happy and less productive than those who are pleasantly challenged. With a just a few small changes, you’ll find that you’re soon able to get back to a normal workload and perform better than ever.

 

About Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede IT Job Search Tech Recruiter ExpertStephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. Some people just write résumés; he cares about the whole job search. Servings as a Job Search Recruiting Agent, he provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and innovation leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy. Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreedeTo see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, text “STUCK” to 866-294-1324 to start a dialogue OR click on the calendar below to schedule a free 30-minute résumé assessment: