Tag: employment

Kick in the Pants: How to Stop Wasting Your Time and Find the Ultimate Recruiter

Kick in the Pants: How to Stop Wasting Your Time and Find the Ultimate Recruiter

In today’s job market, there’s perhaps no worse feeling than sending out an unsolicited application to an opening you read about online, knowing that you’ll likely never even get a response. We’ve all been there, trolling the job boards, checking companies’ websites, and poking around LinkedIn for the next great opportunity. When the facts show that most people who send resumes out online don’t get the job — or even an interview — why do so many of us waste our time with it?

The people who get the really good jobs aren’t any different than you; they simply know that it’s people who make it possible, not your resume alone. Of course, some people get lucky and find great work through online application systems. It can happen. But your time is better spent focusing on two additional tactics: using your network and finding a great recruiter.

Today we’re going to focus on finding you the ultimate tech recruiter. It’s not hard, but it’s also not what you might expect. Can we let you in on a little secret? To find amazing recruiters, you have to do more than seek them out — you have to help them find you.

A recruiter is your advocate on the job hunt; a professional who will listen to you, challenge you, give you useful feedback, and help make seemingly impossible connections possible. Finding the ultimate recruiter can make all the difference in your job search.

How To Find The Best Recruiter For You

Use your network. Ask respected colleagues about their experiences with recruiters, and get the contact info for those who actually found your associate a job.

Do your homework online. LinkedIn is a treasure trove of talented recruiters with a seemingly infinite variety of focus areas. Make connections online with those who look promising.

Get tips from companies you admire. Call up the companies where you would love to work and ask them if they use a particular recruiter or staffing agency — make sure to get the contact information.

Stay informed.

If you’re keeping up-to-date on industry news (and you are, right?), you’ll likely see the names of recruiters show up now and again, especially in press releases when companies make a new hire.

Look on message boards in your tech specialty.

Find the message board in your precise field and see if anybody has already recommended a recruiter. If not, start up a new thread.

How to Help Recruiters Find You

One of the best parts about recruiters is that often, they will seek you out for great opportunities — that is, if they can find you.

Keep all communication short, specific, and to-the-point.

Make sure to include keywords so your messages don’t get lost in overstuffed inboxes.

Tell a story with your resume.

With an easy-to-understand resume, your recruiter will better remember your skills and have an easier time telling companies about you.

Avoid generic cover letters.

Recruiters are a busy bunch, so be specific and concise in your cover letter so they know exactly how they can help you.

Build a relationship.

Like any relationship, a successful pairing involves trust, honesty, communication and respect — treat your recruiter with dignity, and he or she will return the favor.

Be ready to hit the ground running.

The work of recruiters is to fill job openings, often quickly. The more you emphasize your preparedness, the better you’ll stand out as a candidate your recruiter will suggest for the next big opportunity.

Use directories to save you hours of research looking for the right recruiter.

At ITtechExec, one of our main goals is to make the job search process more convenient and simple for our client members. And because we really believe that being matched with the right technical recruiters for you is essential to any career move, we offer several different directories at low cost:

Our Directory of 1350+ U.S. Technical Recruiters

Our Directory of 800+ U.S.-based IT Project/Program Management Recruiters

Our Directory of U.S. CIO Recruiters

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

Kick in the Pants: How to Find the Best Mentor For Your Career

Kick in the Pants: How to Find the Best Mentor For Your Career

career mentorIf there’s one thing that separates wildly successful people from everybody else, it’s often the presence of a mentor.

In the IT and tech worlds as in life, we can’t do everything on our own. We need good advice, a sounding board, and the perspective of somebody who understands where we’re coming from. So why do so many people avoid mentor-mentee relationships?

Because most people don’t understand how to get a mentor, if they realize they need one at all.

A great mentor is rarely handed to you. Sure, some people naturally fall into mentorships without making a concerted effort, but this isn’t something you want to leave to chance. In tech and IT, it’s imperative to be at the top of your game and to think like an entrepreneur. A mentor can help you make the most out of your job and show you how to turn it into your life’s work, not just another 9 to 5.

However, there’s a catch: finding the right person for you. But don’t despair. Mentees have found their mentor matches for centuries, and you can, too. All it takes is a little work.

How to Find Your Best Mentor

First, you need to realize that most mentorship happens organically.

The words “will you be my mentor?” should ideally never come out of your mouth. That’s because good relationships develop naturally over time. In fact, you may already have a mentor if you seek the counsel of a trusted advisor regularly. Don’t discount any relationship just because the person in the mentor role isn’t in your exact field or industry. If he or she is valuable to your career, the person becomes your mentor as soon as you start thinking of them as such. No further acknowledgment is necessary.

If you haven’t found your mentor yet, determine what traits and qualities an ideal mentor would have to be useful to your specific work life.

Does your mentor need to have taken your career path? Or would it be better to get an outsider’s perspective? Do they need to be senior-level, or would somebody with just a few extra years’ experience suffice? Remember that mentors can come from anywhere, so don’t set your sights too narrow.

Start or deepen a professional relationship with your would-be mentor.

If you’ve pinpointed a stranger as your ultimate mentor, do not start by asking him or her for mentorship. For new as well as old contacts, let them know that you value their knowledge and would appreciate their professional opinion. Invite them to coffee or lunch, and get to know them (or know them better). If and only if you feel that the relationship is comfortable for both of you, see if you can continue asking their advice in the future on an ongoing basis.

Be the relationship’s maintenance person.

When you’re receiving the benefits of mentorship, make your gratitude known. Say please and thank you. Ask your mentor about his or her life, and offer your help. Mentorship might look from the outside like a one-way street, but nothing is further from the truth. It’s up to you to nurture the relationship — and eventually, to pay it forward by taking on a mentor of your own.

 

Your Tech Job Search – The Real Skinny: You Don’t Have to Move to Silicon Valley to Find a Great Tech Job

Your Tech Job Search – The Real Skinny: You Don’t Have to Move to Silicon Valley to Find a Great Tech Job

Looking for the perfect tech job or IT job for you?

Your tech job search doesn’t have to be difficult or force you to relocate somewhere else across the country.

technical resume writer tech job searchWhen you’re frustrated with your tech job search, it’s tempting to think of moving to an area where it seems like people are getting hired left and right. But the truth is, you don’t have to move to California to get your dream tech job. In fact, there are several good reasons why you shouldn’t.

Take our native New York, for example. With major tech companies like Verizon, Time-Warner, IBM, and Siemens, the employment rate is growing at an annual increase of 3.08%, compared to the national average of 1.8%. And the jobs aren’t just opening up in New York City. CompTIA reports that there are 18,645 tech companies located throughout the state with an emerging abundance of openings in areas such as Poughkeepsie-Newburgh-Middletown.

With an average IT salary of $85,244, there are plenty of good reasons to stay in New York — the ninth-highest ranking state in terms of salary compared to all 50, plus Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico.

Convinced yet? Here are a few more great reasons to keep pounding the (local) pavement in your tech job search:

Avoid an over-saturated market.

In highly saturated markets like Silicon Valley’s, there may be more opportunity, but there’s also more competition for the available tech jobs and IT careers that are available..

Save yourself moving costs.

Unless you’re a top-ranking employee, most employers won’t cover moving costs, which can set you back a bundle — and twice that if you decide to move back.

Consider cost of living.

While Silicon Valley paychecks tend to be fatter, cost of living is dramatically higher than in most of New York. Your disposable income could flatline, or even decrease, depending on your job and where you live.

If you’re stuck in a rut with your tech job search, don’t pack up that moving truck just yet. Give us a call, and we’d be happy to work with you on finding a job that fits your IT career path and your ideal geographical location.

 

What To Do If Your Company Gets Acquired

What To Do If Your Company Gets Acquired

corporate mergerThere’s nothing employees want to hear less than that their company is about to go through a merger or an acquisition. But in the tech sector especially, the shifting tides of the marketplace mean that these changes are a reality many people must face. While it’s tempting to bury your head in the sand until the rocky times are over, that’s simply not an option.

You want to swim — not sink — no matter what happens to your current job, and the key is to take action now and get prepared.

Let’s face the music: Mergers and acquisitions happen all the time. Perhaps your competitor wants to control the market share and snatches up your company without a second thought. Or maybe your company is already a market leader in a sector your competitor wants to break into. Whatever the situation, jobs are at risk during the transition, and that goes for the other company’s employees, too.

Finding out that change is afoot can come as a shock to employees and create an exceptionally stressful, tense environment. After all, mergers and acquisitions put your livelihood at risk. It’s no wonder that work atmospheres change instantly as soon as the news spreads.

The important thing to remember is that nothing’s set in stone until the leadership makes personnel decisions; it’s not a guaranteed death sentence to your job.

Don’t let your stress get the better of you, and seize this opportunity to build yourself a “lifeboat” to get you to your next job, if necessary.

While ideally, we’d all be perfectly prepared to get a great new job at the drop of a hat, that’s not the case for many people. Whether or not your business is going through a merger or acquisition right now, it’s smart to follow the steps below so you’ll never be caught off guard.

How to Survive a Merger or Acquisition

Get your finances in shape.
Planning a big purchase? Now’s the time to put that on hold. Eliminate any unnecessary spending and come up with a plan so you’ll be in good financial shape for the time it takes you to find a new job — just in case.

Refresh your resume.
It’s a great idea to always be updating your resume, but if you haven’t, start right now. You want to be ready to send it out to potential employers at the drop of a hat, especially if others in your same role will be on the job market at the same time as you.

Reach out to contacts.
Rekindle valuable relationships and reach out to new contacts that will strengthen your network. The sooner you do this, the better position you’ll be in if you need to let them know you’re looking for a new job.

Leverage HR.
Break out your hiring paperwork and see if you have any clauses written into it about whether your role can be laid off, severance pay, or non-compete agreements. Human resources mangers also often have a wealth of resources to help you find your next job, if necessary.

Keep your morale and work ethic high.
Show your superiors that you can take changes in stride by resisting the gossip and negativity that inevitably occur during mergers and acquisitions. You’ll make a great impression on those around you, which is a valuable edge to have during this transitional time.

 

About Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (June 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You?

The Real Skinny: Why You Can’t Succeed in Tech Without Creativity

The Real Skinny: Why You Can’t Succeed in Tech Without Creativity

tech careerThe word “creativity” is highly misunderstood.

What do you think of when you hear it? Finger-painting in kindergarten, perhaps? Or even a marketing executive coming up with a killer ad campaign? The first things that come to mind when we hear the word usually have little or nothing to do with our jobs in the IT and tech sectors. Most of us are guilty of offloading creative responsibility onto others because it’s “not something we’re good at.”

We’re here to tell you that this train of thought is a big mistake.

Creativity is everyone’s responsibility, whether you’re highly technical or not. That’s because it plays a different role in every individual’s life. But what is the common theme amongst all creative people?

That creativity means good ideas — and the know-how to execute them.

(Now doesn’t that sound like something you can do?)

Today more than ever, we are seeing tech businesses leverage creativity to benefit the bottom line as well as the world. Think Google’s self-driving car. Or the way Netflix has revolutionized the way we consume movies and television. These companies leveraged their creativity by addressing real-world problems, trying something new, and taking a risk.

In other words, they were creative.

Creativity means innovation, risk, and newness. It means thinking of solutions nobody has considered before. It means sticking your neck out and taking a leap of faith.

Creativity isn’t a guarantee of success. But successful creative solutions have the power to change the world. And it’s the willingness to take such risks that separates out the best employees from everyone else.

Can you start being creative in your job? Absolutely, no matter what it is that you do. Start by looking at the problems you encounter every day with fresh eyes and daring to ask what if?

 

About Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (June 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You?

Executive Job Market Trends & Analysis (aka “Will I Stay or Will I Go?”)

Executive Job Market Trends & Analysis (aka “Will I Stay or Will I Go?”)

ExecuNet recent;y released some excerpts from their upcoming Job Market Intelligence Report for 2012.

The Importance of Resume-Writing Credentials

The Importance of Resume-Writing Credentials

Hiring practices have changed enormously over the last decade as employers gravitate to online postings, resume databases, and automated screening software. Combine these changes with the recent surge in unemployment, and job seekers face a complex and challenging task to create their marketing materials and manage their job search for best results.

Congratulations, You’re Perfectly Adequate. When Can You Start?

Congratulations, You’re Perfectly Adequate. When Can You Start?

This entry is the third in our series by Sara, a recent college graduate who has been facing the daunting task of finding her first “real” job. In this post, she talks about receiving her first official offer and discovering that sometimes even when you do get an offer, it isn’t exactly what you were hoping for.

The Plight of the Recent College Grad

The Plight of the Recent College Grad

Meet Sara. You probably know many others like her. She just graduated from college, and she is facing her first real job search. Not only is she discovering the job market is flooded with thousands of other entry-level candidates, but she is also realizing that college did not really prepare her for answering that all important job search question: “What are you looking for?”