Tag: IT career

How #Career Paths Are Like the Roomba

How #Career Paths Are Like the Roomba

For all of you Roomba fanatics out there (and I’m one of them), you will appreciate this post. Now it could just be that I have spent way too much time watching this thing zip around my home,
but as I watched it zigzag its way across one room to another the other day, it occurred to me that the way the Roomba maneuvers is a lot like my own career path, and the paths of most people I know.

IT Outsourcing: Is It the End of In-House IT?

IT Outsourcing: Is It the End of In-House IT?

Today’s discussion topic for #TCFchat (hosted by the Tech Career Forum Wednesdays at 3pm Eastern on Twitter) will center around the IT outsourcing market in the U.S. and the changing skills sets that will be (and already are) required from IT workers.

Don’t Get Twitter? Start Chatting & You Will

Don’t Get Twitter? Start Chatting & You Will

With more than 600 chats happening across Twitter each week, it is surprising that none of them has catered to IT and technical career issues, especially as the war for talent in the technical arena heats up. Well, now we have one. Hosted by the Technical Career Forum, #TCFchat is held each Wednesday at 3pm Eastern.

Techies & Their Careers: Stop Thumbing Your Nose at Social Media

Techies & Their Careers: Stop Thumbing Your Nose at Social Media

technical resume tips
Techie careers
Sheree Van Vreede (@rezlady)

If there’s one stereotype about techies that is almost always true (and I have a family full of them) is that they can talk all day about virtualization and network security issues and debate the merits of this solution or that, but they are pretty mum when it comes to talking about their careers. They want you to be impressed (if they even think about that at all) with how they can use their knowledge of technology to solve real business problems, but they want to show, not tell. They are high-level problem solvers, not philosophers.

Talking is overrated anyway.

It’s Time to Come Out of the Shadows

Ten years ago, that quality wasn’t a big issue in the workplace. In fact, it was kind of expected. The techies would hide out in their cubicle caves devising the next solution or migration, and everyone else basically tried to stay out of their way. Today, however, techies often find themselves getting a bad rap, needing to fight to show that they are more than just a commodity that can be outsourced on a whim, that they know how to communicate their knowledge in a way that “tells” value as well as “shows” it. It’s an annoyance, for sure, but like it or not, it’s where the market is continuing to head.

Also, it’s more than about just being more approachable at work; with social media becoming more and more a part of our personal lives, the idea of “engagement” is now a hot topic when it comes to pursuing our careers and how we position ourselves to “influence” the virtual marketplace. Whether you are looking for the next position or happy where you currently are, it is wise to figure out how to use social media to “chat” about your “core talkable difference,” in other words, what makes you unique in your knowledgebase and how you can talk about it. It’s time to stop thumbing your nose at social media as a tool for helping you in your career.

I know, I know, I can hear you now: “Social media is overhyped.” “Social media is a waste of time.” “Social media is just for GenYers.”
And you know what? All of that is somewhat true. What’s also true, however, is that social media is a tool that you can use to your advantage if you know how to do so (I know because I’ve tried it!). If someone tells you that social media is just a time-waster, chances are they aren’t that knowledgeable about it in the first place. You need to get advice from those who use it effectively, and the only way to do that is to get on there…(just sayin’).

Social Media & the Techie

So here are three ways techies can get more chatty across social media and use it to their advantage in their careers:

Blogging.

I know…who has time, right? But blogging is where you can really shine, especially if you know how to drive traffic to your site. You don’t have to talk about how wonderful you are, just communicate your knowledge, share tips, link up with like-minded others. Think of it less as “selling” yourself and more as directing your career down the path that most interests you.

LinkedIn Groups/Answers.

Both the Groups and Answers features on LinkedIn are good tools for engaging with others and for getting an opportunity to share and respond to information about your main topics of interest. You can position yourself as someonen to listen to as well as someone who listens to others.

Twitter Chats.

Some people will call Twitter the biggest waste of time on the Internet, and it certainly can be…if you don’t have a strategy for how you are using it. Not only can you “tweet” out your blog links and LI group responses, but also you can engage in Twitter chats that are relevant to your background. Here are two we recommend:

  1. #ITchat (Tues., 1pm, Eastern): Each week this chat covers a different topic related to IT.
  2. #TCFchat (Wed., 3pm, Eastern): Hosted by the Tech Career Forum, this chat covers issues related to career and job search, from resume to personal branding to the state of the IT job market. You can learn more about the Tech Career Forum and #TCFchat on LinkedIn. You can also find out about the latest questions/topics for the upcoming Wednesday chat.

The ITtechExec Way

To arm yourself with more tools in your technical job search arsenal, we offer a free Technical Jobs report & Online Identity Assessment to our followers. We also offer a 10% discount on our solutions. Take advantage of our offer just by signing up to follow this blog or go to our website ITtechExec (be sure to indicate in the “How did you hear about us?” box that you found us through our blog).

CIO & IT Career Project Management: How to Plan for Success

CIO & IT Career Project Management: How to Plan for Success

As I work with senior-level IT leaders, IT operations directors, as well as IT program and project managers, I hear more and more about failed technology implementations. Not that the technology itself failed, although that certainly happens too. What really intrigues me is the level of project failure from an operational, functional, and process standpoint.

Engagement and IT: You Can No Longer Have One Without the Other

Engagement and IT: You Can No Longer Have One Without the Other

Today’s buzzword of the moment is “engagement.” If you’ve spent more than five minutes “engaging” in social media these days, you can’t miss it. If we’re not talking about “communities,” we’re talking about “engagement.” Are relationships (and not just with other techies) becoming more essential to building a successful career in IT? Is engagement truly the wave of the future? Or is there still room for the mastermind Geeks in the back corner, spending all day with their heads in the clouds?