Tag: tech jobs

Should You Have a Video Resume?

Should You Have a Video Resume?

video resumeSending traditional resumes into the void can feel like you’re throwing away your time and energy over and over again. In a competitive IT and tech job market, candidates who don’t cut it often won’t even receive a polite rejection letter. (The nerve!) One work-around to the drudgery of resume submissions is creating an impressive, highly individualized video resume. But how do you know if a video IT resume (or other technical resume) is going to get you the job—or turn you into a laughing stock?

You should only create a video resume if it fits the culture of the company and position where you’re applying.

1. Know your audience. Tailor everything about your video—from how you’re dressed to the words you use to your tone of voice—to the precise company you’re applying to. Don’t use the same generic video to apply to multiple jobs!

2. Keep it to the minimum length. It takes less than 30 seconds to scan a resume—60 if it catches the reader’s eye. Your video should be no longer than one minute, so highlight only what’s vital for viewers to know.

3. Act natural. This means no reading from scripts and no reciting your resume—no cue cards, even! Be yourself, and don’t be afraid to do as many takes as necessary until you get it right.

4. Show why you’re using the video format. You’re using the video format because you want to show off things that can’t be contained on a regular resume. Make it clear you have a good reason for others to watch you instead of looking over your written resume.

5. Make it stunning. There’s no question that you should strive to make your video as high quality as possible. Don’t send a video that is anything less than perfect!

Think long and hard about where you’ll be sending your video, because once you click “send,” you lose control of that content forever.

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

Should You Talk Openly About Your Income?

Should You Talk Openly About Your Income?

salaryWhat would you do if you found out your colleagues were making significantly more than you for the exact same work?

Think back to all of those times you stayed late at the office. The skipped lunch breaks. Missed social opportunities. And especially all of those brilliant ideas of yours that helped your organization save money and work more efficiently. As a top-notch employee, you’d expect to be earning as much—or even a little more—than your peers.

Reality check: You might not be. But you’d never know it unless you talked about it.

There’s nothing like discussing salary to summon up corporate smoke and mirrors that deflect the conversation, or even prevent it from happening in the first place. It’s understandable—money is personal, and even emotional. Thinking of your value as a worker in terms of dollars and cents can feel dehumanizing and uncomfortable. Add to that the old-fashioned idea that discussing money just isn’t polite, and you’ve got radio silence when it comes to how much money you and your co-workers make.

Even worse, companies benefit hugely from propagating the myth that it’s illegal to discuss salaries. Whether it’s written into the contract that you sign upon hiring or gently discouraged by your HR manager, many corporations don’t want you discussing how much you make with fellow employees. After all, if you find out that they’re making more than you, you might ask them for more money.

Sound fishy to you? It is.

In a large majority of cases, it is absolutely legal to discuss your salary with your coworkers. You don’t need to be part of a union, and you don’t need to be a government employee. Though certain workers are exempt from this law (such as supervisors and independent contractors), roles are sometimes miscategorized and actually do receive legal protection for salary discussion.

Since 1935, the National Labor Relations Act has protected the right of employees to engage in discussions for mutual aid or protection—and that includes talking about salaries. The problem? Many consider the act to be weak in terms of holding companies accountable for violations. This is one reason President Obama has been working to strengthen workplace transparency and accountability, having recently signed two executive orders to do just that.

For tech and IT workers where salaries can have a very wide range, it’s crucial not to get stuck at a lower salary range than what you deserve. And for women and minorities in tech, the wage gap can spell out an average of 25 percent less earnings than non-minorities. We think that everybody deserves to be paid fairly for what they do. Don’t you?

So what can you do if you think you’re earning less than you should be?

Find out if you’re protected under the National Labor Relations Act.

Don’t assume that you aren’t! Try contacting the National Labor Relations Board if you’re unsure.

Learn the power of negotiation.

One of the major reasons for pay gaps is that some people are simply better negotiators than others. Leverage the power of a convincing argument to show what you’re worth and get a better offer.

Ask for a raise.

Are your co-workers asking for more money, but not you? Don’t hold your breath until your boss decides to give you more money. Ask for it, and you might just get it.

Don’t suffer in silence.

If you have the legal protection to do so, go ahead and talk openly about how much you’re earning and why you think it should change. It could make a major difference in your career advancement—and your bank account.

Report violations to the NLRB.

How much you earn should depend on your qualifications, not your gender, age, race, negotiating skills, or how much the boss likes you. Work against inequality and the illegal silencing of salary discussions by contacting the NLRB if necessary. You’ll not only help your own salary, but you’ll promote a more just and fair treatment for all qualified employees.

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says Don’t Waste Time In A Job You’ve Outgrown

IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says Don’t Waste Time In A Job You’ve Outgrown

CEO of ITtechExec Stephen Van Vreede encourages readers to take on challenging, exciting roles that ask the best of them, which means being honest about when it’s time to move into a job with more challenges and responsibilities.

Rochester, NY — September 1, 2015 — Stephen Van Vreede, CEO of ITtechExec, published a new blog post titled “5 Signs You’ve Outgrown Your Job.” In the post, he reveals the top five signs of having outgrown a job and advises workers to look for roles they can grow into to stay motivated, challenged, and happier at work.

Van Vreede says, “For IT and tech workers, the sky is truly the limit to just how far your career can go. People in the industry have active, creative minds that want to be put to great use, solving complex problems and making the world a better place. Nobody wants to waste your brilliant mind in a role that doesn’t demand the best of you. That’s why it’s vital to watch out for the signs of outgrowing your job—and remember, it can sneak up on you faster than you realize.”

Stephen Van Vreede is a personal brand strategist, certified resume writer, job search agent, and the CEO and owner of ITtechExec. Stephen has 10 years of experience in employment strategy and 8 years of corporate management experience. He holds an M.B.A. in Marketing from Villanova University.

Read the entire article here. http://www.ittechexec.com/5-signs-youve-outgrown-your-job/

About ITtechExec:

ITtechExec is a new kind of full-service employment agency that combines resume writing, portfolio building, and job search solutions to launch extraordinary tech careers in the 21st century job market. CEO and Executive Solutions Guide Stephen Van Vreede created ITtechExec in 2001, using his background of personal branding and corporate management to create a multi-pronged approach that gets results. ITtechExec serves as the job seeker and career changer’s trusted adviser, helping them make the best of the careers they’ve built and guiding them into the professional futures they desire.

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IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says Invest In Your Health To Improve Your Career Outlook

IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says Invest In Your Health To Improve Your Career Outlook

CEO of ITtechExec Stephen Van Vreede explains why healthier workers are better at what they do and how you can boost your wellbeing to gain an edge on your career.

Rochester, NY — Aug 25, 2015 — Stephen Van Vreede, CEO of ITtechExec, published a new article titled “Being Healthy Makes You a Better Employee.” In the article, he discusses the career-halting effects of poor diet, stress, and lack of exercise, encouraging IT and tech professionals to develop physical wellness as a workplace advantage in the competitive professional landscape.

Van Vreede says, “You might think that because it’s your brain that does the heavy lifting, your body is irrelevant to the work you do. Not so! Even the most intelligent and intellectual among us is simply unable to work our best when our bodies are unhealthy. Remember, we are holistic, integrated organisms geared toward maintaining equilibrium… All of this is to say, our professional talents and skills are only as good as our bodies will allow them to be.”

Stephen Van Vreede is a personal brand strategist, certified resume writer, job search agent, and the CEO and owner of ITtechExec. Stephen has 10 years of experience in employment strategy and 8 years of corporate management experience. He holds an M.B.A. in Marketing from Villanova University.

Read the entire article here. http://www.ittechexec.com/kick-in-the-pants-being-healthy-makes-you-a-better-employee/

About ITtechExec:

ITtechExec is a new kind of full-service employment agency that combines resume writing, portfolio building, and job search solutions to launch extraordinary tech careers in the 21st century job market. CEO and Executive Solutions Guide Stephen Van Vreede created ITtechExec in 2001, using his background of personal branding and corporate management to create a multi-pronged approach that gets results. ITtechExec serves as the job seeker and career changer’s trusted adviser, helping them make the best of the careers they’ve built and guiding them into the professional futures they desire.

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5 Signs You’ve Outgrown Your Job

5 Signs You’ve Outgrown Your Job

toon944Having a job that’s easy, high-paying, and totally free from stress sounds too good to be true—but it can also be a sign that you’ve outgrown your job.

For IT and tech workers, the sky is truly the limit to just how far your career can go. People in the industry have active, creative minds that want to be put to great use, solving complex problems and making the world a better place. Nobody wants to waste your brilliant mind in a role that doesn’t demand the best of you. That’s why it’s vital to watch out for the signs of outgrowing your job—and remember, it can sneak up on you faster than you realize.

1 You aren’t challenged anymore.

Work that’s too easy gets old, fast. If you’re not being asked to stretch your abilities, you’ll stagnate instead of grow, which can actually hurt you if you want to take on a more challenging role down the road.

2 You’ve perfected your role and workflow.

Have you automated your tasks and condensed your week’s work into a fraction of the hours it’s supposed to take? It’s time to move on and put those hours you’ve saved to good use.

3 You’re doing way more than your job description.

Managers often ask workers to perform at a higher level for a period of time before giving them a promotion. If you’ve essentially been doing another job for more than six months, it’s time you got a new title—and a raise.

4 You’re bored to death.

Life is too short (and too interesting) to spend time bored. Watching the second hand on the clock? It’s time to move onwards and upwards.

5 You know you could do so much more.

Do you feel constrained by what you’re “allowed” to do as part of your job? Do you see ways you could improve things, but you keep hitting roadblocks from your superiors? It’s time to take that ambition and use it to get yourself a shiny new job—one that asks a lot of you and recognizes you for your amazing contributions.

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

Kick in the Pants: Being Healthy Makes You a Better Employee

Kick in the Pants: Being Healthy Makes You a Better Employee

diet42Could vegetables be the key to getting that promotion?

Paul Marciano’s 2010 book Carrots and Sticks Don’t Work debunked the myth that employers could improve performance with reward or punishment systems—but literal carrots could actually make a world of difference. That’s because a wealth of evidence suggests that those who eat right, exercise, and manage stress are markedly better employees. Companies use this knowledge to their advantage by offering health-conscious workplace perks to protect their most valuable assets: their staff.

But consider this: You can also use this information to get ahead in your job and build the career of your dreams.

You might think that because it’s your brain that does the heavy lifting, your body is irrelevant to the work you do. Not so! Even the most intelligent and intellectual among us is simply unable to work our best when our bodies are unhealthy. Remember, we are holistic, integrated organisms geared toward maintaining equilibrium. If a room is too cold, our bodies will try to balance it out by sending blood away from the surface of the skin where it loses heat; if we skip a night’s sleep, our body will demand those hours back in the form of a nap. All of this is to say, our professional talents and skills are only as good as our bodies will allow them to be.

This means if you’re good at what you do now, you might have the potential to be a whole lot better.

Take, for example, the matter of exercise. You might think going to the gym is a waste of time because you get paid to think, not to sweat. However, studies show that brain activity changes dramatically based upon how much a body moves. Exercise literally makes us more creative and improves our thinking and reasoning skills. How is that for an incentive to get up from your desk?

Studies show that people who eat healthier food are a whopping 25 percent more productive than their counterparts. And chew on this—fresh, natural foods like leafy greens, fruit, nuts, and healthy proteins can actually improve brain cognition. Have you ever been so hungry you can’t think straight? Then you already know from experience! But remember, unhealthy foods might make you feel satiated, but they don’t provide the necessary nutrients to boost your brain power.

And don’t forget to take into account stress when evaluating your health. For busy tech and IT professionals, stress can seem like it’s part of the job. However, stress endangers our cognitive functions, and can be especially harmful to memory—not to mention a host of serious physical ailments that could lead to one sick day after another. In addition to eating right, getting enough sleep, and exercising, learning how to manage stress is vitally important to your overall workplace performance.

What differences will you see when you start adopting healthier habits? You’ll…

  • Work more efficiently
  • Come up with creative solutions
  • Have mental and physical endurance
  • Maintain a sharp memory
  • Improve the way you think

Start by making a change today. You’ll not only notice that you start to feel better, but you’ll also see that your climb up the career ladder can be easier—and more pleasant—than you ever imagined.
Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says Doing Good, Not Just Good Work, Is Crucial To Career Success

IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says Doing Good, Not Just Good Work, Is Crucial To Career Success

CEO of ITtechExec Stephen Van Vreede discusses the importance of taking a socially and environmentally conscious perspective on work done in the tech industry.

Rochester, NY — Aug 18, 2015 — Stephen Van Vreede, CEO of ITtechExec, published a new blog post titled “Why Doing Good—Not Just Good Work—Matters.” In the post, he explains that high-quality work is only one small part of the overall picture employers are looking for in their employees, emphasizing the growing importance of doing good for hiring senior and executive-level tech workers.

Van Vreede says, “If you want to put your skills to use, you need to know that tech companies these days are looking for more than a neutral employee who does only what’s asked and goes home at the end of the day. They’re looking for innovative movers and shakers concerned about creating something that’s not just cool or clever, but also creates positive change in the world.”

Stephen Van Vreede is a personal brand strategist, certified resume writer, job search agent, and the CEO and owner of ITtechExec. Stephen has 10 years of experience in employment strategy and 8 years of corporate management experience. He holds an M.B.A. in Marketing from Villanova University.

Read the entire article here. http://www.ittechexec.com/the-real-skinny-why-doing-good-not-just-good-work-matters/

About ITtechExec:

ITtechExec is a new kind of full-service employment agency that combines resume writing, portfolio building, and job search solutions to launch extraordinary tech careers in the 21st century job market. CEO and Executive Solutions Guide Stephen Van Vreede created ITtechExec in 2001, using his background of personal branding and corporate management to create a multi-pronged approach that gets results. ITtechExec serves as the job seeker and career changer’s trusted adviser, helping them make the best of the careers they’ve built and guiding them into the professional futures they desire.

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The Real Skinny: Why Doing Good—Not Just Good Work—Matters

The Real Skinny: Why Doing Good—Not Just Good Work—Matters

Do you use your tech wizardry for good or evil?

Okay, hopefully you’re not using it for evil. But if you want to put your skills to use, you need to know that tech companies these days are looking for more than a neutral employee who does only what’s asked and goes home at the end of the day. They’re looking for innovative movers and shakers concerned about creating something that’s not just cool or clever, but also creates positive change in the world.

After all, who has more power and resources to do good than IT and tech professionals? Technology is at the root of every scalable force for good that exists in our modern times. Whether it’s as simple as advances in security systems or as complex as 3D-printed prosthetic limbs, tech is making life better for humans and the planet. It’s unstoppable—so leverage that power for your career!

But you don’t need to be a do-gooder to impress companies with your skills. It’s easier than you might think to incorporate positive change into your existing career and skill development. Ask yourself the following questions:

  • Can I make a small change in my work that makes life easier for at least one person?
  • Is there a place I can volunteer to build my skills and help others simultaneously?
  • Are there any junior employees I can mentor and positively influence?
  • Can I take my side project to the next level by incorporating socially or environmentally responsible elements?
  • Are there untapped resources I could donate to make an improvement for my company or clients?

Remember, the core mission of most companies is to make life better for people and the planet. When you show a dedication to this mission—and a white-hot skill set—you’ll make an unforgettable impression at your current and future workplaces.

 

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!

IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says The Best Way To Earn More Money Is To Negotiate Well

IT Employment Expert Stephen Van Vreede Says The Best Way To Earn More Money Is To Negotiate Well

CEO of ITtechExec Stephen Van Vreede shares his tried-and-true salary negotiation tips, explaining to readers that salary isn’t about worth — it’s about the ability to negotiate.

Rochester, NY — Aug 11, 2015 — Stephen Van Vreede, CEO of ITtechExec, published a new article titled “How To Ask For the Salary You Deserve.” In the article, he reveals the secrets to successful, civil salary negotiation, offering time-tested advice to IT and tech employees looking to increase their earnings at their next job.

Van Vreede says, “You might be worth a million bucks, but you could wind up with a fraction of that number if you make the wrong salary negotiation moves. Most people aren’t thrilled at the prospect of salary negotiation, which is understandable. Done incorrectly, it can feel like a tense argument that leaves everyone offended and unhappy. But even if you’ve had an unsuccessful negotiation or two, that doesn’t mean you can’t improve your odds the next time around. Negotiation is a skill you can learn with the help of a coach or close friend. And, once you’ve mastered it, you’ll be amazed at how simple it can be to take your salary range up to the next level.”

Stephen Van Vreede is a personal brand strategist, certified resume writer, job search agent, and the CEO and owner of ITtechExec. Stephen has 10 years of experience in employment strategy and 8 years of corporate management experience. He holds an M.B.A. in Marketing from Villanova University.

Read the entire article here. http://www.ittechexec.com/how-to-ask-for-the-salary-you-deserve/

About ITtechExec:

ITtechExec is a new kind of full-service employment agency that combines resume writing, portfolio building, and job search solutions to launch extraordinary tech careers in the 21st century job market. CEO and Executive Solutions Guide Stephen Van Vreede created ITtechExec in 2001, using his background of personal branding and corporate management to create a multi-pronged approach that gets results. ITtechExec serves as the job seeker and career changer’s trusted adviser, helping them make the best of the careers they’ve built and guiding them into the professional futures they desire.

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How To Ask For the Salary You Deserve

How To Ask For the Salary You Deserve

money36You might be worth a million bucks, but you could wind up with a fraction of that number if you make the wrong salary negotiation moves.

Most people aren’t thrilled at the prospect of salary negotiation, which is understandable. Done incorrectly, it can feel like a tense argument that leaves everyone offended and unhappy. But even if you’ve had an unsuccessful negotiation or two, that doesn’t mean you can’t improve your odds the next time around. Negotiation is a skill you can learn with the help of a coach or close friend. And, once you’ve mastered it, you’ll be amazed at how simple it can be to take your salary range up to the next level.

Check your emotional baggage at the door.

Negotiations can inflate or deflate your sense of worth in ways that trigger strong emotions — something that’s far from helpful when you’re starting out on the job. Remember that both sides are looking out for their own best interests, and whatever happens, it’s not personal. When you treat your negotiation like business, your employer knows you’re serious about the job.

Put yourself in their shoes.

You’ve had time to learn about the company, its culture, and your new job. If you were in your employer’s position, how would he or she want to see the negotiation go? For instance, a small, family-owned company might not be able to offer the same salary as an international corporation, so they might be surprised to learn you’re asking for a very high salary. Or, a hip new tech company might take a more casual attitude toward negotiation than you’re used to.

Never, ever put yourself down.

The time for modesty is never during a negotiation. (Or an interview, for that matter.) When the topic of salary and benefits come up, that’s the crucial moment to make your expertise and professionalism known. Don’t back down on discussing your qualifications!

But don’t be too aggressive, either.

At the same time, seeming overly proud or self-congratulatory can come off as rude or condescending during a negotiation. A good negotiation feels civil and friendly, not like you’re on the attack. Tame any aggression and transform it into confidence instead.

Take it slow and easy.

Don’t cut to the chase when you’re in a salary negotiation — let the conversation flow at its own pace. Even better? Let your future employer be the one to start talking brass tacks.

Know what you want ahead of time.

Websites like Glassdoor.com offer valuable salary information based upon job title and location, so set your expectations before you enter the negotiation. Understand the bare minimum you need in terms of salary and benefits to make the job worth your time.

Never be the first to name a number.

It’s a classic piece of advice, but sometimes hard to follow — let your employer name the actual salary figures; don’t let them persuade you into revealing your ideal number. If they insist, let them know that you’re looking for a salary that’s fair for somebody with your skills, experience, and qualifications.

Get educated ahead of time.

To learn more about this, check out our full presentation:

Stephen Van VreedeAbout Stephen—-

Stephen Van Vreede is not your average IT/technical résumé writer. He provides career strategy and concierge job search solutions for senior (15+ years) (ITtechExec) and up-and-coming (NoddlePlace) (5-15 years) tech and technical operations leaders. Stephen and his team focus on building simplified, targeted, and certain career move campaigns, be it an external search or an internal promotion. He is co-author of UNcommon with career development leader Brian Tracy (out June 11, 2015). Contact Stephen directly at Stephen@ittechexec.com or send him an invite at https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenvanvreede. To see whether Stephen and his team are a good fit for you, take their free (and anonymous) 1-minute compatibility quiz, Is the ITtechExec Approach a Good Match for You? Also, feel free to take his complimentary resume self-assessment quiz, How Certain Can You Be About Your Technical Resume? You might be surprised by what you find out!